2016 BBWAA Hall of Fame Ballot

With a timeless swing and grace in the outfield that reminded fans of past icons, Ken Griffey Jr. was seen as one of the preeminent players of his era.

Now, the player known formerly as “The Kid” is on the cusp of earning the same title belonging to many of the legends he was compared to: Hall of Famer.

Griffey leads 15 new additions to the Baseball Writers’ Association of America Hall of Fame ballot in 2016 for consideration of the game’s ultimate honor. The new candidates will join 17 former players who remain eligible after receiving at least five percent of votes last year, making a total of 32 players on this year’s ballot. The results of the voting will be announced on Jan. 6.

First-time candidates on the ballot include 13-time All-Star, 10-time Gold Glove Award winner and 1997 American League Most Valuable Player Ken Griffey Jr., seven-time All-Star closer and owner of 601 saves Trevor Hoffman and eight-time Gold Glove Award-winner Jim Edmonds.

Other first-time candidates include Garret Anderson, Brad Ausmus, Luis Castillo, David Eckstein, Troy Glaus, Mark Grudzielanek, Mike Hampton, Jason Kendall, Mike Lowell, Mike Sweeney, Billy Wagner and Randy Winn.

In 2015, the BBWAA elected Craig Biggio, Randy Johnson, Pedro Martinez and John Smoltz – the first time in 60 years that baseball writers elected four candidates in one year.

Fresh Faces

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Griffey checked off many of the conventional boxes for Hall of Fame inclusion during his 22-year career with the Mariners, Reds and White Sox. His honors include 13 All-Star Game selections, 10 consecutive American League Gold Glove Awards in center field – tied for the second-highest total among all center fielders – and seven Silver Slugger Awards. He was the AL MVP in 1997, as well as the All-Star Game MVP in 1992. In addition to being the Mariners’ all-time leader in home runs (417), Griffey ranks sixth in baseball history with 630 round trippers. He also stands among the game’s greats in total bases (13th) and runs batted in (15th).

Griffey combined his plate prowess with stellar play in the field, where he stands among baseball’s top 20 center fielders in defensive games played (fourth), putouts (sixth) and assists (12th).

Griffey, however, is not the only stellar center fielder to make his debut on the ballot. Jim Edmonds, a 17-year veteran of the Angels, Cardinals, Padres, Cubs, Brewers and Reds, debuts on the ballot with a highlight tape full of diving catches to support him. The acrobatic Edmonds was a four-time All-Star who won eight Gold Glove Awards in center field and also added a Silver Slugger Award in 2004. An All-Star in Anaheim, Edmonds truly flourished in St. Louis, where he finished in the top-five of NL MVP voting twice (2000-4th, 2005-5th) and solidified the middle of a Cardinals lineup that claimed two pennant titles. Edmonds’ career .527 slugging percentage ranks 50th all-time, and his defensive rankings as a center fielder (15th in defensive games, 20th in putouts and assists) place him among the very best.

Meanwhile, two relief pitchers make their case the Hall of Fame bullpen. Trevor Hoffman, the second-most successful closer in baseball history with 601 saves, will make his ballot debut. Hoffman, who used a devastating changeup to overwhelm hitters for 18 seasons, was the first pitcher to reach the 500- and 600-save milestones. A major key to the Padres’ run of success in the late 1990s, Hoffman pitched in seven All-Star Games, led the NL twice in saves and recorded at least 30 saves in 14 out of 15 seasons from 1995-2009. He was a top-10 finisher in the NL Cy Young Award four times (1996-99, 2006) who also finished among the top-10 in league MVP voting twice (1997, 2006). In addition to his remarkable saves total, Hoffman possesses the second-most games finished (856) and 11th-most games pitched (1,035) in major league history.

Meanwhile, fellow reliever Billy Wagner is also hoping for the Hall of Fame also debuts on the ballot. Wagner, a 16-year veteran with the Astros, Phillies, Mets, Red Sox and Braves, recorded 422 career saves —the second-highest total among left-handed relievers and fifth-highest overall. The seven-time All-Star used a wipe-out slider to keep hitters at bay; his career walks plus hits per nine innings pitched (WHIP) ratio of 0.998 is the lowest mark of all-time among relievers with at least 500 innings pitched. His career 2.31 ERA is also extraordinary, as it’s the lowest among left-handers who have pitched at least 500 innings in the live-ball era.

Of course, Griffey, Edmonds, Hoffman, Wagner are not the only players to debut on this year’s BBWAA ballot. The other newcomers include Garret Anderson, Brad Ausmus, Luis Castillo, David Eckstein, Troy Glaus, Mark Grudzielanek, Mike Hampton, Jason Kendall, Mike Lowell, Mike Sweeney and Randy Winn.

Returning to the Ballot

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Seventeen former players are returning to the 2016 BBWAA ballot after receiving at least five percent of the overall vote in 2015.

  • Mike Piazza
    69.9%
    4th year
  • Jeff Bagwell
    55.7%
    6th year
  • Tim Raines
    55.0%
    9th year
  • Curt Schilling
    39.2%
    4th year
  • Roger Clemens
    37.5%
    4th year
  • Barry Bonds
    36.8%
    4th year
  • Lee Smith
    30.2%
    14th year
  • Edgar Martinez
    27.0%
    4th year
  • Alan Trammell
    25.1%
    15th and final year
  • Mike Mussina
    24.6%
    3rd year
  • Jeff Kent
    14.0%
    3rd year
  • Fred McGriff
    12.9%
    7th year
  • Larry Walker
    11.8%
    6th year
  • Gary Sheffield
    11.75%
    2nd year
  • Mark McGwire
    10.0%
    10th and final year
  • Sammy Sosa
    6.6%
    4th year
  • Nomar Garciaparra
    5.5%
    2nd year

**Trammell is eligible for the BBWAA ballot for the 15th-and-final time, grandfathered onto the ballot following the eligibility rule changes enacted in 2014. Mark McGwire is eligible for the BBWAA ballot for the 10th-and-final time.

Historic perspective

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The writers have elected seven candidates over the past two years, the most in any two consecutive years since 1954-55 when seven players were elected. The BBWAA record for a two-year span is eight players, coming in the inaugural Class of 1936 Ty Cobb, Walter Johnson, Christy Mathewson, Babe Ruth and Honus Wagner and then in 1937 with Nap Lajoie, Tris Speaker and Cy Young.

If the BBWAA were to elect three-or-more candidates in 2016, it would mark the first time in BBWAA voting history that at least three candidates had been elected in three consecutive years.

The Class of 2016 will be inducted on July 24 in Cooperstown.

Quick Candidate Bios

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GARRET ANDERSON

Three-time All-Star and two-time Silver Slugger Award winner who ranks as the Angels’ all-time leader in games played, hits, runs scored, runs batted in, total bases, extra-base hits and doubles. A member of Angels’ 2002 World Series champion team.


BBWAA Bio

1st year on ballot…Played 17 seasons with the Angels, Braves and Dodgers…Three-time All-Star (2002-03, 2005)…Two-time Silver Slugger Award winner in outfield (2002-03)…Finished second in 1995 American League Rookie of the Year voting…One Top 10 finish in league MVP voting (2002-4th)… Hit .300-or-better in six full seasons (1995, 1997, 1999, 2002-04)…Drove in 100-or-more runs in four straight seasons (2000-03)…Finished in AL top five in hits three times (1997-4th, 2001-5th, 2003-4th)…Won the All-Star Game MVP Award in 2003…Led AL in doubles twice (2002-03), fielding percentage as a left fielder twice (2001, 2003), putouts as a left fielder once (2003) and assists as a left fielder once (2003)…Ranks as the Angels’ all-time leader in games played (2,013), hits (2,368), runs scored (1,024), runs batted in (1,292), total bases (3,743), extra-base hits (796) and doubles (489)…Ranks 46th on career doubles list (522), 87th in runs batted in (1,365), 91st in total bases (3,984) and 93rd in hits (2,529)…One of only 13 players in MLB history to collect at least 10 RBI in one game, when he paired two home runs with 10 RBI in a game against the Yankees on Aug. 21, 2007…Appeared in 36 postseason games over eight series, hitting five home runs with 36 hits, 22 RBI and 17 runs scored…Won a World Series with 2002 Anaheim Angels after batting .281 and driving in six runs in seven games.

BRAD AUSMUS

Longtime Astros catcher who won three NL Gold Glove Awards and ranks third among backstops in putouts and seventh for defensive games played. Also is one of only five catchers with at least 1,500 hits and 100 stolen bases. A member of Astros’ lone NL pennant-winning club in 2005.


BBWAA Bio

1st year on ballot…Played 18 years with the Padres, Tigers, Astros and Dodgers…All-Star selection in 1999…Three-time National League Gold Glove Award winner at catcher (2001-02, 2006)…Ranks 7th on career list for games played as a catcher (1,938)…Also ranks 3rd all-time in putouts by a catcher (12,839)…Led AL once (1999) and NL three times (2001, 2005, 2006) in fielding percentage by a catcher...Caught highest percentage of baserunners stealing in NL in 1997 (49.5%)…One of only eight catchers in history with at least 1,500 hits and 100 stolen bases…Appeared in eight postseason series with the Astros in five years, batting .245 with 26 hits, 12 runs scored, seven RBI and three home runs in 35 games…Member of Astros’ 2005 NL Championship team.

JEFF BAGWELL

Four-time All-Star and three-time Silver Slugger Award-winner was unanimous choice for NL MVP Award in 1994, and finished in the Top 10 of NL MVP voting five other times. Added a Gold Glove Award at first base to his resume in 1994. The 1991 NL Rookie of the Year went on to lead the league in games played four times and runs scored three times. An Astro for all 15 seasons of his career, his 449 home runs are the most in franchise history.


BBWAA Bio

6th year on ballot…Played 15 seasons, all for the Astros…Four-time All-Star (1994, 1996-97, 1999) and three-time National League Silver Slugger Award winner (1994, 1997, 1999) at first base…Won 1991 National League Rookie of the Year Award…Unanimous winner of 1994 NL Most Valuable Player Award…Finished in Top 10 of NL MVP voting five other times: 1996 (9th), 1997 (3rd), 1999 (2nd), 2000 (7th) and 2001 (7th)…Won 1994 NL Gold Glove Award at first base…Led NL in runs scored three times (1994, 1999-2000), doubles once (1996), RBI once (1994) and walks once (1999)…Led NL in games played four times (1992, 1996-97, 1999)… Scored 100-or-more runs in eight of nine seasons from 1996-2004 and drove in 100-or-more runs seven times in that span…Ranks 28th on career walks list (1,401), 32nd in slugging percentage (.540), 38th in home runs (449, also an Astros record), 39th in on-base percentage (.408), 49th in RBI (1,529), 63rd in runs scored (1,517) and 70th in total bases (4,213)…Hit better than .300 in six seasons (1993-94; 1996; 1998-2000)…Batted .226 in nine postseason series, with two home runs, 13 RBI and 19 walks…Played in NLCS in 2004 and 2005…Member of Astros’ 2005 NL Championship team.

BARRY BONDS

Baseball’s all-time home run king (762) won seven NL MVP awards – the most league MVPs of any player in history. A 14-time All-Star, 12-time Silver Slugger Award-winner and eight-time Gold Glove Award-winner in left field, he also set the single-season home run mark with 73 in 2001. Led NL in walks 12 times (including a big league-record 232 in 2004), on-base percentage 10 times and slugging percentage seven times. Collected seasons of 100-or-more RBI and 100-or-more runs scored 12 times each. In addition to home runs, is also baseball’s all-time leader in walks (2,558) and intentional walks (688). Ranks among baseball’s 10 best in career runs (third), total bases (fourth), RBI (fifth), slugging percentage (fifth), on-base percentage (sixth) and games played (10th). Powered Giants to NL pennant in 2002.


BBWAA Bio

4th year on ballot…Played 22 seasons with the Pirates and the Giants…14-time All-Star (1990, 1992-98, 2000-04, 2007), eight-time Gold Glove Award winner as left fielder (1990-94, 1996-98) and 12-time Silver Slugger Award winner (1990-94, 1996-97, 2000-04)…Won seven National League Most Valuable Player Awards, the most of any player all-time (1990, 1992-93, 2001-04)…Finished in Top 10 of NL MVP voting six other times: 1991 (2nd), 1994 (4th), 1996 (5th), 1997 (5th), 1998 (8th) and 2000 (2nd)…Finished sixth in 1986 NL Rookie of the Year voting…Set single-season record with 73 home runs in 2001 and also led NL in home runs in 1993 with 46…Led NL in walks 12 times (1992, 1994-97, 2000-04, 2006-07) including a big league-record 232 in 2004…Led NL in on-base percentage 10 times (1991-93, 1995, 2001-04, 2006-07), slugging percentage seven times (1990, 1992-93, 2001-04), batting average twice (2002, 2004), RBI once (1993) and runs scored once (1992)…Scored 100-or-more runs 12 times (1990, 1992-93, 1995-98, 2000-04)…Drove in 100-or-more runs 12 times (1990-93, 1995-98, 2000-02, 2004)…Hit .300-or-better in 11 seasons (1990, 1992-94, 1996, 1998, 2000-04)…Holds career big league records for home runs (762), walks (2,558) and intentional walks (688)…Ranks third in career runs (2,227), fourth in total bases (5,976), fourth in RBI (1,996), fifth in slugging percentage (.607), sixth in on-base percentage (.444), 10th in games played (2,986), 14th in doubles (601) and 33rd in stolen bases (514)…Batted .245 in nine postseason series, with 37 hits, 33 runs scored, nine home runs, 24 RBI and 52 walks in 48 games…Hit .471 with four homers, six RBI and 13 walks in 2002 World Series against the Angels…Played in NLCS in 1990-92 and 2002…Member of Giants’ 2002 NL Championship team…Won 2001, 2002 and 2004 Hank Aaron Award.

LUIS CASTILLO

Three-time All-Star and three-time Gold Glove Award winner at second base who hit .300-or-better seven times and led the NL in stolen bases twice. Ranks as Marlins’ all-time leader in games, hits, runs, triples, walks and steals. A member of Marlins’ 2003 World Series champion team.


BBWAA Bio

1st year on ballot…Played 15 seasons with the Marlins, Twins and Mets…Three-time All-Star selection (2002-03, 2005)…Three-time National League Gold Glove Award winner at second base (2003-05)…Hit .300-or-better seven times (1999, 2000, 2002-03, 2005, 2007, 2009)…Scored 100-or-more runs once (2000)…Led NL in stolen bases twice (2000, 2002) and sacrifice hits once (15-2003)…Paced league in putouts (286) for second basemen in 2003…Ranks 36th all-time in assists by a second baseman (4,484) and 93rd overall in stolen bases (370)…Compiled 35-game hitting streak in 2002, tied for the longest streak in history by a second baseman…Ranks as Marlins all-time leader in games (1,128), hits (1,273), runs (675), triples (42), walks (533) and stolen bases (281)…Appeared in four postseason series over two years with the Marlins and Twins, batting .220 with 18 hits and six runs scored in 20 games…Member of the 2003 Marlins club that won the World Series.

ROGER CLEMENS

Eleven-time All-Star won a record seven Cy Young Awards and received Cy Young votes in five other seasons. Named the 1986 AL MVP with Boston and finished Top 10 in league MVP voting five more times. Won the pitching Triple Crown in back-t0-back seasons (1997-98) and led his league in ERA seven times, second only to Lefty Grove (who had nine ERA titles). Also led his league multiple times in shutouts (six times), strikeouts (5x), wins (4x), win percentage (3x), complete games (3x), innings pitched (2x) and games started (once). Tallied six 20-win seasons, 15 seasons with 200-plus innings and 12 200-plus strikeout campaigns. Ranks among the game’s best in career strikeouts (third), games started (seventh) and wins (ninth). A two-time World Champion with the Yankees (1999, 2000).


BBWAA Bio

4th year on the ballot… Pitched 24 seasons for Red Sox, Blue Jays, Yankees and Astros…Five 20-win seasons, 15 seasons with 200-plus innings and 12 200-plus strikeout campaigns…Won record seven Cy Young Awards (1986-87, 1991, 1997-98, 2001, 2004)…Received Cy Young Award votes five other times: 1988 (6th), ’90 (2nd), ’92 (3rd), 2000 (6th) and ’05 (3rd)…Won 1986 AL Most Valuable Player Award and finished in Top 10 of league MVP voting in 1990 (3rd), 1991 (10th), 1997 (10th), 2001 (8th) and 2004 (8th)…Named to 11 All-Star teams (1986, 1988, 1990-92, 1997-98, 2001, 2003-05); started games in 1986, 2001 and 2004…Finished sixth in 1984 AL Rookie of the Year voting…Won AL pitching Triple Crown in 1997 and 1998, leading league in wins, ERA and strikeouts…Led his league in ERA seven times, the second-most all-time (1986, 1990-92, 1997-98, 2005) and complete games three times (1987-88, 1997)…Ranks 3rd all-time in strikeouts (4,672), 7th in games started (707) and 9th all-time in wins (354)…Led league in shutouts six times (1987-88, 1990-92, 1997), strikeouts five times (1988, 1991, 1996-98), victories four times (1986-87, 1997-98), winning percentage three times (1986, 2001, 2004), innings pitched twice (1991, 997) and games started once (1991)…Appeared in 24 postseason series (nine Division Series, nine League Championship Series and six World Series), posting a 12-8 record with a 3.75 ERA in 35 games…Appeared on two WS Championship teams (Yankees: 1999, 2000).

DAVID ECKSTEIN

Two-time All-Star infielder who is tied for 15th in career fielding percentage among shortstops. A major contributor to world championship teams in Anaheim in 2002 and St. Louis in 2006, the latter with whom he hit .364 to capture World Series MVP honors.


BBWAA Bio

1st year on ballot…Played 10 seasons with the Angels, Cardinals, Blue Jays, Diamondbacks and Padres…Two-time All-Star (2005-06)…Finished 4th in 2001 American League Rookie of the Year voting…Batted .300-or-better one time (2007) and scored 100-or-more runs once (2002)…Led AL in sacrifice hits twice (2001-02)…Also led NL second basemen in fielding percentage twice (2009-10), and AL shortstops in fielding percentage once (2004)…Ranks 15th in career fielding percentage among shortstops…Played in nine career postseason series (two ALDS, two NLDS, two NLCS, one ALCS, two World Series), batting .278 (49-for-176) with two home runs, 18 RBI, seven stolen bases and 26 runs scored in 44 games…Won 2006 World Series MVP award with Cardinals after batting .364 with eight hits, four RBI and three runs scored in five games…Batted a combined .333 with 17 hits and nine runs scored in World Series victories with Angels (2002) and Cardinals (2006).

JIM EDMONDS

A 17-year veteran of the Angels, Cardinals, Padres, Cubs, Brewers and Reds, debuts on the ballot with a highlight tape full of diving catches to support him. The acrobatic Edmonds was a four-time All-Star who won eight Gold Glove Awards in center field and also added a Silver Slugger Award in 2004. An All-Star in Anaheim, Edmonds truly flourished in St. Louis, where he finished in the top-five of NL MVP voting twice (2000-4th, 2005-5th) and solidified the middle of a Cardinals lineup that claimed two pennant titles. Edmonds’ career .527 slugging percentage ranks 50th all-time, and his defensive rankings as a center fielder (15th in defensive games, 20th in putouts and assists) place him among the very best.


BBWAA Bio

1st year on ballot…Played 17 seasons with the Angels, Cardinals, Padres, Cubs, Brewers and Reds…Four-time All-Star selection (1995, 2000, 2003, 2005)…Eight-time Gold Glove Award winner in center field (1997-98, 2000-05)…Won National League Silver Slugger Award in 2004…Placed eighth in 1994 AL Rookie of the Year Award voting…Finished Top 10 in league MVP Award voting twice (4th in 2000, 5th in 2004)…Batted .300-or-better five times (1996, 1998, 2001-02, 2004)…Drove in 100-more-runs four times (1995, 2000-01, 2004)…Scored 100-or-more runs four times (1995, 1998, 2000, 2004)…Hit at least 30 home runs five times and 40-or-more twice (2000, 2004)…Ranks 50th all-time in slugging percentage (.527), 59th in home runs (393) and 61st in on-base plus slugging percentage (.903)…In the field, ranks 15th among center fielders in defensive games (1,768) and 20th in putouts (4,343) and assists (116)…Hit an extra-innings homer in Game 6 and then made a diving catch in Game 7 of the 2004 NLCS to help Cardinals win the pennant…Won a World Series with the 2006 Cardinals and posted a career .274 batting average in 64 postseason games (63-for-230) with 13 homers and 42 RBI in 14 series.

NOMAR GARCIAPARRA

Six-time All-Star shortstop was unanimous choice for 1997 AL Rookie of the Year, and went on to win two consecutive batting crowns (1999, 2000). Tallied eight seasons with a .300-or-better average, seven seasons with at least 20 home runs, six seasons with 100-plus runs scored and four seasons with at least 100 RBI. Won the Silver Slugger Award in his rookie campaign when he also led the league in putouts by a shortstop. Later paced the AL in doubles (2002) and finished in the Top 10 of AL MVP voting a total of five times. Posted a career batting average of .313, fourth all-time among shortstops who have played in at least 1,000 big league games. Member of the 2004 Red Sox squad that went on to win the World Series.


BBWAA Bio

2nd year on the ballot…Played 14 seasons with Red Sox, Cubs, Dodgers and Athletics…Unanimous choice as American League Rookie of the Year in 1997 after hitting .306 with 30 home runs, 98 RBI, 22 stolen bases and league-leading totals in hits (209) and triples (11)…Two-time AL batting champion (1999: .357; 2000: .372)…Four seasons with at least 100 RBI (1998-99, 2002-03), six seasons with 100-plus runs scored (1997-2000, 2002-03), six seasons with at least 190 hits (1997-2000, 2002-03), seven seasons of 20-plus home runs (1997-2000, 2002-03, 2006) and eight seasons with a batting average of at least .300 (1997-2000, 2002-04, 2006)…Led AL with 56 doubles in 2002…Led AL in putouts by a shortstop in 1997 (249)…Named to six All-Star Games…Won 1997 Silver Slugger Award at shortstop…Finished in Top 10 of AL MVP voting five times (1997-2000, 2003), including a second-place finish in 1998…Posted career batting average of .313, third all-time among shortstops who have played in at least 1,000 big league games…Batted .321 in seven postseason series over five years with Red Sox and Dodgers, totaling seven home runs and 24 RBI in 32 games…Member of 2004 Red Sox team that went on to win the World Series title.

TROY GLAUS

Four-time All-Star and two-time Silver Slugger Award winner at third base who compiled five 30-plus home run seasons and led the AL with 47 round-trippers in 2000. Also drove in at least 100 runs four times and scored at least 100 runs three times. Hit .385 with three home runs and eight RBI to win 2002 World Series MVP honors as part of Angels’ seven-game triumph.


BBWAA Bio

1st year on ballot…Played 13 seasons for Angels, Diamondbacks, Blue Jays, Cardinals and Braves…Four-time All-Star selection (2000-01, 2003, 2006)…Two-time American League Silver Slugger Award winner at third base (2000-01)…Led AL with 47 home runs in 2000…Eight seasons with at least 20 home runs, including five 30-plus home run seasons and two seasons with 40-or-more (2000-01)…Drove in at least 100 runs four times (2000-02, 2006) and scored at least 100 runs three times (2000-01, 2006)…Led AL in defensive games at third base three consecutive seasons (2000-02)…Ranks fourth in Angels’ franchise history in home runs (182), fifth in slugging percentage (.497) and sixth in walks (470)…Played in six postseason series over four seasons with Angels, Cardinals and Braves, batting .321 (25-for-78) with nine home runs, 18 runs scored and 16 RBI in 24 games…Won 2002 World Series MVP Award after batting .385 with three home runs and eight RBI to lead Angels to the seven-game victory.

KEN GRIFFEY JR

Griffey checked off many of the conventional boxes for Hall of Fame inclusion during his 22-year career with the Mariners, Reds and White Sox. His honors include 13 All-Star Game selections, 10 consecutive American League Gold Glove Awards in center field – tied for the second-highest total among all center fielders – and seven Silver Slugger Awards. He was the AL MVP in 1997, as well as the All-Star Game MVP in 1992. In addition to being the Mariners’ all-time leader in home runs (417), Griffey ranks sixth in baseball history with 630 round trippers. He also stands among the game’s greats in total bases (13th) and runs batted in (15th).
Griffey combined his plate prowess with stellar play in the field, where he stands among baseball’s top 20 center fielders in defensive games played (fourth), putouts (sixth) and assists (12th).


BBWAA Bio

1st year on ballot…Played 22 seasons with the Mariners, Reds and White Sox…13-time All-Star (1990-2000, 1994, 2007)…Won the 1992 All-Star Game MVP Award…10-time American League Gold Glove Award winner in center field (1990-99), tied for second-most all-time among outfielders…Seven-time Silver Slugger Award winner (1991, 1993-94, 1996-99)…Won 1997 American League Most Valuable Player Award after batting .304 and leading the league with 56 home runs, 147 RBI, 125 runs scored, 393 total bases and a .646 slugging percentage…Finished in Top 10 of AL MVP voting six other times: 1991 (9th), 1993 (5th), 1994 (2nd), 1996 (4th), 1998 (4th) and 1999 (10th)…Finished 3rd in 1989 AL Rookie of the Year voting…Led AL in home runs four times (1994, 1997-99)…Also led AL in total bases twice (1993, 1997) and intentional walks twice (1997, 1999)… Drove in 100-or-more runs eight times (1991-93, 1996-2000)…Scored 100-or-more runs six times (1993, 1996-2000)…Hit .300-or-better eight times (1990-94, 1996-97, 2005)…Won 2005 NL Comeback Player of the Year Award…Mariners’ all-time leader in home runs (417)…Ranks sixth all-time in career home runs (630), sixth in intentional walks (246), 13th in total bases (5,271), 15th in runs batted in (1,836), 33rd in games played (2,671), 33rd in runs scored (1,662), 35th in slugging percentage (.538) and 44th in doubles (524)…Also ranks fourth in career defensive games (2,145), sixth in putouts (5,147) and 12th in assists (141) among all center fielders…Batted .290 in four postseason series, with 20 hits, 12 runs scored, six home runs, 11 runs batted in and eight walks in 18 games…Scored winning run in Game 5 of the 1995 ALDS against the Yankees to send Mariners to their first ALCS appearance.

MARK GRUDZIELANEK

1996 All-Star infielder who also won an AL Gold Glove Award at second base in 2006. Paced NL in doubles in 1997 and compiled five seasons with a .300-or-better batting average.


BBWAA Bio

1st year on ballot…Played 15 seasons with the Expos, Dodgers, Cubs, Cardinals, Royals and Indians…All-Star selection in 1996…Won 2006 American League Gold Glove Award at second base…Led NL in doubles (54) in 1997…Hit .300-or-better five times (1996, 1999, 2003-04, 2007)…Scored 100-or-more runs one time (2000)…Collected 201 hits in 1996…Tied for 29th in career fielding percentage among second baseman (.986)…Played in four postseason series, batting .188 with 16 hits and five runs batted in 21 games.

MIKE HAMPTON

Two-time All-Star pitcher who finished second in 1999 NL MVP voting after going 22-4 for the Astros. Won a Gold Glove Award in 2003 and also added five straight Silver Slugger Awards from 1999-2003. Compiled five consecutive seasons with 200-plus innings en route to 148 career victories.


BBWAA Bio

1st year on ballot…Pitched 16 seasons for Mariners, Astros, Mets, Rockies, Braves and Diamondbacks…Finished second in 1999 National League Cy Young Award voting after going 22-4 with a 2.90 ERA for Astros…Led NL in wins and winning percentage (.846) in 1999 campaign…Compiled one 20-win season (1999) and five consecutive seasons with 200-or-more innings (1997-2001)…Two-time All-Star selection (1999, 2001)…Led NL in home runs per nine innings pitched twice (1999, 2000)…Won 2003 Gold Glove Award and five consecutive Silver Slugger Awards (1999-2003), and in 2003 became the first (and still only) pitcher to win a Gold Glove and Silver Slugger in the same season…Sixteen career home runs ranks 13th all-time among players who were primarily pitchers…Appeared in eight postseason series (six League Division Series, one League Championship Series and one World Series), posting 2-4 record with a 3.74 ERA in 11 games…Named MVP of 2000 NLCS after winning two games and allowing no runs on nine hits while striking out 12 over 16 innings…Member of Mets’ 2000 NL Championship team.

TREVOR HOFFMAN

The second-most successful closer in baseball history with 601 saves, will make his ballot debut. Hoffman, who used a devastating changeup to overwhelm hitters for 18 seasons, was the first pitcher to reach the 500- and 600-save milestones. A major key to the Padres’ run of success in the late 1990s, Hoffman pitched in seven All-Star Games, led the NL twice in saves and recorded at least 30 saves in 14 out of 15 seasons from 1995-2009. He was a top-10 finisher in the NL Cy Young Award four times (1996-99, 2006) who also finished among the top-10 in league MVP voting twice (1997, 2006). In addition to his remarkable saves total, Hoffman possesses the second-most games finished (856) and 11th-most games pitched (1,035) in major league history.


BBWAA Bio

1st year on ballot…Pitched 18 seasons for Marlins, Padres and Brewers…Ranks second in ML history in saves (601), and was the first pitcher to reach both 500- and 600-save milestones…Also ranks second all-time in games finished (856) and 11th all-time in games pitched (1,035)…Named National League Fireman of the Year by the Sporting News in 1996 and 1998…Won the NL Rolaids Relief Award in 1998 and 2006…Finished in Top 10 of NL Cy Young Award voting four times (1996-5th, 1998-2nd, 1999-6th, 2006-2nd)….Finished in Top 10 of NL MVP voting twice (1997-7th, 2006-10th)…Also won 2004 Hutch, 2006 Lou Gehrig Memorial and 2008 Branch Rickey Awards…Seven-time All-Star (1998-2000, 2002, 2006-07, 2009)…Led NL in saves twice (1998, 2006)…Recorded 53 saves in 1998, tied for fifth-highest single-season total in history, and also set ML record (since surpassed) with 41 consecutive converted save chances…Posted at least 30 saves in 14 of 15 consecutive seasons (1995-2002; 2004-2009)…Ranks second to Mariano Rivera in seasons with 20-plus saves (15) and 30-plus saves (14), and is tied with Rivera for most seasons with 40-plus saves (nine)….Ranks seventh among pitchers with 6.99 career hits-per-nine innings average…Also ranks eighth all-time in career walks plus hits per innings pitched (1.058) and strikeouts-per-nine innings (9.36)...MLB award for best NL reliever named in his honor…Holds Padres all-time team records for most saves (552), ERA (2.76) and games pitched (902)…Pitched in six career postseason series with Padres, going 1-2 with a 3.46 ERA and 14 strikeouts in 12 games…Earned a combined three saves and a win in the 1998 National League Division and Championship series while striking out 11 hitters in 7.1 innings…Member of Padres’ 1998 NL Championship team.

JASON KENDALL

Three-time All-Star catcher who hit .300-or-better six times. Ranks second among backstops in career putouts, fourth in hits and fifth in games caught. Tallied 189 steals, the second-highest total among catchers in the modern era.


BBWAA Bio

1st year on ballot…Played 15 seasons with the Pirates, Athletics, Cubs, Brewers and Royals…Three-time All-Star (1996, 1998, 2000)…Finished third in 1996 National League Rookie of the Year Award voting…Hit .300-or-better six times (1996, 1998-2000, 2003-04)…Scored 100-or-more runs one time (2000)…Led league in games caught eight times (1997-98, 2000, 2002-05, 2008) and assists five times (1997, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2010)… Caught at least 140 games in nine big league seasons, the most seasons among all catchers…Among players who appeared in at least 50 percent of their career games as a catcher, his 2,195 hits rank fourth all-time behind Ivan Rodriguez, Ted Simmons and Carlton Fisk…Ranks second among catchers in career putouts (13,019) and fifth in defensive games (2,025)…Ranks second among all modern-era catchers with 189 stolen bases…Played in four postseason series, batting .224 (11-for-49) with three RBI in 12 games.

JEFF KENT

Five-time All-Star who collected four Silver Slugger Awards at second base. The 2000 NL MVP finished among Top 10 in league MVP voting three other times and hit 351 home runs while at the keystone sack – the most ever hit by a second baseman. Tallied eight seasons with at least 100 RBI, three seasons with at least 100 runs scored and three seasons with a .300-or-better average. Helped power Giants to the NL pennant in 2002.


BBWAA Bio

3rd year on the ballot…Played 17 seasons with the Blue Jays, Mets, Indians, Giants, Astros and Dodgers…Named to five All-Star Games (1999-2001, 2004-05)…Won four Silver Slugger Awards at second base (2000-02, 2005)…Named 2000 National League Most Valuable Player and finished in Top 10 of NL MVP voting in three other seasons (1997-8th; 1998-9th; 2002-6th)…Hit .300 or better in three seasons (2000, 2002, 2007)…Drove in 100-or-more runs eight times (1997-2002, 2004-05) and scored 100-or-more runs three times (2000, 2002, 2005)…Hit 20-or-more homers in 12 seasons and reached the 30-homer mark three times (1998, 2000, 2002)…Led NL in extra base hits once (2002-81) and in sacrifice flies twice (1998-10; 2001-13)…Defensively, led all NL second basemen in assists once (2001-390) and double plays once (2002-113)…Ranks 25th on career doubles list (560) and 51st on career RBI list (1,518)…His 351 home runs as a second basemen are most ever at the position…Posted eight seasons with 20 home runs and 100 RBI, the most by any 2B in MLB history…Appeared in 49 postseason games over 11 series, hitting .276 with nine home runs, 25 runs scored and 23 RBI…Member of Giants’ 2002 National League Championship team.

MIKE LOWELL

Four-time All-Star with a Silver Slugger Award (2003) and Gold Glove Award (2005) to his credit at third base. Career fielding percentage of .974 at third base is the second-highest mark of all-time. Excelled in the 2007 World Series, batting .400 and capturing MVP honors as part of Red Sox’ four-game sweep.


BBWAA Bio

1st year on ballot…Played 13 seasons with the Yankees, Marlins and Red Sox…Four-time All-Star (2002-2004, 2007)…Won National League Silver Slugger Award (2003) and Gold Glove Award (2005) at third base…Finished fifth in 2007 AL Most Valuable Player Award voting after hitting .324 with 21 home runs and 120 runs batted in…Batted .300-or-better once (2007), and collected 100-or-more RBI three times (2001, 2003, 2007)…Compiled six seasons with at least 20 home runs…Led NL with 11 sacrifice flies in 2002…Defensively, was league-best third baseman in putouts three times (2001, 2002, 2006), double plays three times (2001, 2005, 2007), games twice (2002, 2007) and fielding percentage twice (2003, 2005)…Holds second-highest career fielding percentage among third basemen (.974)…Appeared in eight postseason series, batting .252 (29-for-115) with four home runs and 21 RBI in 34 games…Won three World Series titles with the Yankees (1998-DNP in World Series), Marlins (2003) and Red Sox (2007)…Named 2007 World Series MVP after batting .400 with one home run, four RBI, six runs scored and a stolen base while leading Red Sox to a four-game sweep.

EDGAR MARTINEZ

Seven-time All-Star won five Silver Sluggers and twice finished among Top 10 in AL MVP voting (1995, 2000). A .300-or-better hitter in 10 different seasons, Martinez is one of only nine players in history with 300 homers, 500 doubles, a career batting average higher than .300, a career OBP higher than .400 and a career slugging percentage higher than .500. Ranks as the Mariners’ all-time leader in runs, doubles, walks, RBI, extra-base hits and total bases. MLB named its award for the most outstanding designated hitter in his honor in 2004.


BBWAA Ballot

7th year on the ballot…Played 18 seasons, all with the Mariners…Named to seven All-Star Games (1992, 1995-1997, 2000-2001, 2003)…Won five Silver Slugger Awards (1992, 1995, 1997, 2001, 2003)…Finished third in American League MVP voting in 1995 and 6th in 2000…Won AL batting titles in 1992 (.343) and 1995 (.356)…Led the league in OBP three times (1995, 1998-99) and finished in the top five in 10 different years…Led the AL in games played (145) and runs scored (121) in 1995…Led the league in doubles twice (1992, 1995) and RBI in 2000…Hit .300 or better in 10 full seasons (1990-92, 1995-2001)…Drove in 100-or-more runs six times (1995-98, 2000-01) and scored 100-or-more runs five times (1992, 1995-97, 2000)…One of only 10 players in history with 300 homers, 500 doubles, a career batting average higher than .300, a career OBP higher than .400 and a career slugging percentage higher than .500…Became only the fifth player in the 20th century to hit 50 doubles in two consecutive seasons (1995-96)…Ranks as the Mariners all-time leader in runs (1,219), doubles (514), walks (1,283), RBI (1,261), extra-base hits (838) and total bases (3,718)…Posted sterling 1995 ALDS against New York when he hit .571 (12-for-21) and was on base 18 times in five games and set the record for single-game postseason RBI with seven…In 34 career postseason games (1995 ALDS and ALCS; 1997 ALDS; 2000 ALDS and ALCS and 2001 ALDS and ALCS) hit .266 (34-for-128) with eight homers and 24 RBI…Won the Roberto Clemente Award in 2004, the same year that MLB renamed the Outstanding Designated Hitter Award in his honor, presented annually.

FRED McGRIFF

Five-time All-Star who won three Silver Slugger Awards at first base and finished in the top 10 of MVP voting six times. Paced his league in home runs twice and games played once. Hit 30-or-more home runs 10 times, including seven straight seasons from 1988-94. Also drove in 100-or-more runs eight times and hit .300-or-better four times. Ranks 28th all-time with 493 homers. Member of the 1995 World Series Champion Atlanta Braves.


BBWAA Bio

7th year on the ballot…Played 19 seasons with the Blue Jays, Padres, Braves, Devil Rays, Cubs and Dodgers…A five-time All-Star (1992, 1994-96, 2000)…Won three Silver Slugger Awards (1989, 1992-93) at first base and finished in the top 10 of MVP voting six times (6th in 1989, 10th in 1990, 10th in 1991, 6th in 1992, 4th in 1993, 8th in 1994)…Tied for the league lead in games played in 1995 with 144 and paced the league in homers in 1989 (36) and 1992 (35)…Hit 30-or-more home runs in seven straight seasons from 1988-94 and three more times in 1999, 2001 and 2002…Hit .300-or-better four times (1990, 1994, 1999 and 2001)…Drove in 100-or-more runs eight times (1991-93, 1996, 1999-2002) and scored 100-or-more runs twice (1988, 1993)…Won the All-Star MVP Award in 1994…Won a World Series with the 1995 Atlanta Braves (.261 average, with five runs scored and three RBI) and a career .303 postseason batting average in 50 games (57-for-188) with 10 homers and 37 RBI in 10 series (1989 ALCS; 1993 NLCS; 1995 NLDS, NLCS and WS; 1996 NLDS, NLCS and WS; 1997 NLDS and NLCS) …Had a .992 fielding percentage at first base…Ranks 27th all-time in home runs (493), 43rd in RBI (1,550), 43rd in walks (1,305), 47th in extra base hits (958), 50th in total bases (4,458) and 32nd in intentional walks (171).

MARK McGWIRE

Twelve-time All-Star was the unanimous 1987 AL Rookie of the Year and went on to finish in the Top 10 in league MVP voting five times. Retired as baseball’s all-time best in at-bats per home runs at 10.6 (a mark he still holds) and finished with 583 round-trippers (10th most all-time). Set single-season record with 70 home runs in 1998 (since surpassed) and followed with 65 in 1999. Three-time Silver Slugger Award-winner also won a Gold Glove Award at first base in 1990. Drove in 100-or-more runs seven times and scored 100-or-more runs three times. Led league in numerous categories, including slugging percentage (four times), on-base percentage (2x), walks (2x) and RBI (once). Posted a career .588 slugging percentage, seventh-best in history. Appeared in three World Series, winning with Oakland in 1989.


BBWAA Bio

10th and final year on the ballot…Played 16 seasons, 11½ with Oakland and 4½ with Cardinals…Twelve-time All-Star selection…Five times among Top 10 in MVP (1987, 1992, 1996, 1998-99), including runner-up in 1998, 4th in 1992 and 5th in 1999…Unanimous AL Rookie of the Year in 1987…Gold Glove Award winner at first base in 1990…Three-time Silver Slugger Award winner (1992, 1996, 1998)…Ranks 10th on the all-time home run list with 583…All-time leader in at-bats per home run (10.6)…Led league in home runs four times (1987, 1996, 1998, 1999), including then-major league record 70 HR in 1998…Followed that with a 65-home run season in 1999…Drove in 100-or-more runs seven times (1987, 1990, 1992, 1996-99) and scored 100-or-more runs three times (1996, 1998-99)…Ranks eighth all-time with a .588 slugging percentage…Four times led league in slugging percentage (1987, 1992, 1996, 1998)…Also led league in on-base percentage in 1996 and 1998…Led NL in RBI in 1999…Led league in walks twice (1990, 1998)…Three times among top five in total bases (1987, 1998, 1999)…A career .993 fielder…Hit .217 (28-129) in 42 career postseason games, with five home runs and 14 RBI in 10 postseason series over six years…Appeared in three World Series, winning in 1989 with Oakland…Hit .188 (9-48) with a home run and two RBI in 13 career WS games.

MIKE MUSSINA

Five-time All-Star pitcher recorded 11 seasons with at least 15 victories and in 2008 became the oldest pitcher to post his first career 20-win season at age 39. Received Cy Young Award votes in nine different seasons and won seven AL Gold Gloves Awards on the mound. Led the AL in games started twice, wins once, winning percentage once, shutouts once, innings pitched once, and walks per nine innings pitched (WHIP) once. Owns the sixth-best winning percentage (.638) of any pitcher with at least 250 career victories. Won a total of 270 games and appeared in 16 different postseason series, including two World Series as member of the AL champion Yankees in 2001 and 2003.


BBWAA Bio

3rd year on the ballot… Pitched 18 seasons for Orioles and Yankees…One 20-win season (2008), and at 39 years he became the oldest pitcher to record his first 20-win campaign…11 total seasons with at least 15 wins (1992, 1994-97, 1999, 2001-03, 2006, 2008)…Received Cy Young Award votes eight times: 1992 (4th), 1994 (4th), 1995 (5th), 1996 (5th), 1997 (6th), 1999 (2nd), 2000 (6th), 2001 (5th) and 2008 (6th)…Named to five All-Star teams (1992-94, 1997, 1999…Won seven Gold Glove Awards (1996-99, 2001, 2003, 2008)…Led American League in games started twice (1996, 2008), wins once (1995), winning percentage once (1992), shutouts once (1995), innings pitched once (2000) and walks per nine innings pitched once (1995-2.0)…Finished in Top Five in AL earned-run average rankings seven times (1992, 1994-95, 1999-2001, 2006)…Among pitchers modern-era with at least 250 victories, only Lefty Grove, Christy Mathewson, Roger Clemens, Randy Johnson and Grover Cleveland Alexander have a better career winning percentage than Mussina’s .638 mark…Ranks 17th all-time in strikeouts-to-walk ratio (3.583), 19th in strikeouts (2,813), 33rd in wins (270), 33rd in games started (536) and 39th in winning percentage (.638)…Appeared in 16 postseason series (nine Division Series, five League Championship Series and two World Series), posting 7-8 record with a 3.42 ERA in 23 games…Member of Yankees’ 2001 and 2003 American League Championship teams.

MIKE PIAZZA

A 12-time All-Star, Piazza won the most Silver Slugger Awards (10) and hit the most home runs (396) of any catcher in big league history. The unanimous 1993 NL Rookie of the Year went on to finish in the Top 10 of NL MVP voting seven times. Drove in at least 100 runs six times and scored 100-or-more runs twice. Became the first catcher to collect at least 200 hits (201) in 1997. Also led NL catchers defensively in putouts four times, assists twice, runners caught stealing percentage once and fielding percentage once. Posted a .545 career slugging percentage, the 28th-best mark in history. Was a major factor in Mets’ run to the 2000 NL pennant.


BBWAA Bio

4th year on ballot…Played 16 seasons with Dodgers, Marlins, Mets, Padres and Athletics…Twelve-time All-Star (1993-2002, 2004-05) and 10-time Silver Slugger Award winner (1993-2002), the most Silver Slugger Awards of any catcher in history…Unanimous choice as 1993 National League Rookie of the Year…Won 1996 All-Star Game MVP Award…Finished in Top 10 of NL MVP voting seven times: 1993 (9th), 1994 (6th), 1995 (4th), 1996 (2nd), 1997 (2nd), 1999 (7th) and 2000 (3rd)…Drove in 100-or-more runs in six seasons (1993, 1996-2000)…Scored 100-or-more runs in two seasons (1997, 1999)…Recorded at least a .300 batting average in nine seasons (1993-2001)…Became the first player whose primary position was catcher to record at least 200 hits in a season in 1997 (201)…Hit 396 home runs as a catcher, the top total in big league history…Ranks 29th all-time in slugging percentage (.545) and 47th all-time in home runs (427)…Led all NL catchers in putouts four times (1995-97, 1999), assists twice (1993, 1998), caught stealing once (1993) and fielding percentage once (2000)…Appeared in eight postseason series over five seasons, batting .242 with six home runs and 15 RBI in 32 games…Member of New York Mets NL Championship team in 2000.

TIM RAINES

An All-Star selection in seven straight seasons (1981-87), Raines led the NL in stolen bases four times. Also finished in the Top 10 in NL MVP voting three times and received a Silver Slugger Award in 1986. Hit at least .300 in seven full seasons and scored at least 100 runs in six. Owns the second-highest stolen base percentage (84.7) of any player with at least 300 attempts, and compiled the fifth-most stolen bases (808) in major league history. Led NL outfielders with 21 assists in 1983. Won two World Series titles with the Yankees in 1996 and 1998.


BBWAA Bio

9th year on the ballot…Played 23 seasons with Expos, White Sox, Yankees, A’s, Orioles and Marlins…Named 1981 National League Rookie Player of the Year by the Sporting News…Seven-time All-Star, consecutively (1981-87)…Named 1987 All-Star Game MVP…Finished in the Top 10 in NL MVP voting three times 1983 (5th), 1986 (6th), 1987 (7th)…Received NL Silver Slugger Award in 1986…Led NL in stolen bases four times (1981-84), runs twice (1983, 1987)…Won 1986 NL batting title (.334)…Led league in on-base percentage once (1986) and doubles once (1984)…Six 100-runs seasons…Seven full seasons of hitting .300 or better, four times finishing in the top 10 in average…Sixteen seasons of 10 or more stolen bases, 11 times finishing in the top 10… Ranks second all-time for highest stolen-base percentage (300 or more attempts) with 84.7…Led NL outfielders with 21 assists in 1983…Hit for the cycle on Aug. 16, 1987…Twice collected switch-hit home runs in one game…Hit three home runs in one game (April 18, 1994)…Ranks 5th all-time in stolen bases (808) and 53rd all-time in runs (1,571)…Member of two World Championship teams with the Yankees (1996, 1998)…Hit .270 (34-126) in 34 career postseason games.

CURT SCHILLING

Six-time All-Star pitcher compiled three 20-win seasons, nine seasons with 200-plus innings and five 200-plus strikeout campaigns over a 20-year career. Also recorded three 300-strikeout seasons, third-most in history. Finished among Top Five in Cy Young Award voting four times, including three second-place finishes (2001, 2002, 2004). Also finished in Top 10 of league MVP voting twice. Led his league in strikeout-to-walk ratio (five times), complete games (4x), games started (3x), victories (2x), strikeouts (2x), innings pitched (2x) and winning percentage (once). Owns best strikeout-to-walk ratio (4.383) of any modern-era pitcher, and ranks 15th all-time in punchouts (3,116). Excelled in postseason, compiling a career 11-2 record (.846 win percentage is third-best all-time) with a 2.23 ERA in 19 games. Set single-season postseason record with 56 strikeouts in 2001, when he went on to win co-MVP honors in the World Series with the Diamondbacks. Pitched for three World Series champions: 2001 Diamondbacks, 2004 and 2007 Red Sox.


BBWAA Bio

4th year on the ballot… Pitched 20 seasons for the Orioles, Astros, Phillies, Diamondbacks and Red Sox…Three 20-win seasons (2001-02, 2004), nine seasons with 200-plus innings (1992-93, 1997-98, 2000-02, 2004, 2006) and five 200-plus strikeout campaigns (1997-98, 2001-02, 2004), including three seasons with at least 300 strikeouts (1997-98, 2002)…Only two pitchers (Randy Johnson and Nolan Ryan with six apiece) have recorded more seasons with 300 strikeouts… Received Cy Young Award votes four times, finishing second in the balloting three times: 1997 (4th), 2001 (2nd), ’02 (2nd) and ’04 (2nd)…Finished in Top 10 of league MVP voting in 2001 (10th) and ’02 (10th)…Named to six All-Star Games (1997-99, 2001-02, ’04), drawing starting assignments in 1999 and 2002…Led his league in strikeout-to-walk ratio five times (2001-04, ’06), complete games four times (1996, ’98, 2000-01), games started three times (1997-98, 2001), victories twice (2001 and ’04), strikeouts twice (1997-98), innings pitched twice (1998, 2001) and winning percentage once (2004)…Ranks 15th all-time in strikeouts (3,116)…One of only four pitchers with at least 3,000 career strikeouts and fewer than 1,000 walks…Ranks second all-time in strikeout-to-walk ratio (4.383) and first in that category among pitchers who pitched after 1900…Appeared in 12 postseason series (four Division Series, four League Championship Series and four World Series), posting a 11-2 record with a 2.23 ERA in 19 games (all starts)…Ranks third in postseason winning percentage (.846), fifth all-time in postseason victories (11) and eighth in strikeouts (120)…Set single-season postseason record with 56 strikeouts in 2001…Won 1993 NLCS Most Valuable Player Award and shared 2001 World Series MVP Award with Randy Johnson…Won 1995 Lou Gehrig Memorial Award, 2001 Branch Rickey Award, 2001 Hutch Award and 2001 Roberto Clemente Award…Pitched in postseason for three World Series champion teams (2001, 2004, 2007).

GARY SHEFFIELD

Nine-time All-Star won five Silver Sluggers (one at third base and four more as an outfielder), and finished among Top 10 in league MVP voting six times. Compiled eight 30-plus home run seasons, including two with 40-or-more (1996, 2000). Also hit at least .300 in eight full seasons, recorded 100-plus RBI eight times and scored 100-plus runs seven times. Paced his league in average and total bases in 1992, and on-base percentage in 1996. Ranks 21st all-time in walks (1,475), 25th in home runs (509) and 27th in RBI (1,676). Member of the 1997 World Series champion Marlins.


BBWAA Bio

2nd year on the ballot…Played 22 seasons for Brewers, Padres, Marlins, Dodgers, Braves, Yankees, Tigers and Mets…Named to nine All-Star Games (1992-93, 1996, 1998-2000, 2003-05)…Won five Silver Slugger Awards: one as third baseman (1992) and four as outfielder (1996, 2003-05)…Finished in Top 10 of his league’s Most Valuable Player voting six times: 1992 (3rd), 1996 (6th), 2000 (9th), 2003 (3rd), 2004 (2nd), 2005 (8th)…Hit 20-or-more home runs in 14 seasons, including eight with 30-or-more and two (1996, 2000) with at least 40 home runs…Recorded at least 100 RBI in eight seasons (1992, 1996, 1999-2001, 2003-05), and scored 100-or-more runs in seven seasons (1996, 1999-2000, 2003-05, 2007)…Led league in batting average once (1992: .330), total bases once (1992: 323) and on-base percentage once (1996: .465)…Posted a .300-or-better batting average in eight full seasons (1992, 1996, 1998-2003)…Ranks 21st all-time in walks (1,475), 25th in home runs (509), 26th in RBI (1,676) and 30th in total bases (4,737)…Appeared in nine postseason series over six seasons with Marlins, Braves and Yankees, hitting .248 with six home runs, 19 RBI and 27 runs scored in 44 games…Member of 1997 World Series champion Marlins.

LEE SMITH

Seven-time All-Star reliever ranks third all-time in saves (478) and was the first pitcher to reach the 400-save milestone. Retired as all-time major league leader in saves and games finished (802, now third-most). Received three Rolaids Relief Man of the Year Awards (two in NL, one in AL) and finished among Top 10 in league Cy Young Award voting four times. Also placed eighth in 1991 NL MVP Award voting. Led the NL in saves three times and AL in saves once, and compiled thirteen consecutive seasons with 20-plus saves, 10 seasons with 30-plus saves and three seasons with 40-plus saves. Still holds NL career record for most consecutive errorless games (546) by a pitcher. Tied for 12th all-time in games pitched.


BBWAA Bio

14th year on the ballot…Pitched 18 seasons for Cubs, Red Sox, Cardinals, Angels, Expos, Reds, Yankees and Orioles…Ranks third in ML history in saves (478)… Retired as all-time major league leader in saves and games finished (802)…Tied for 11th in games pitched (1,022)…Named National League Fireman of the Year by the Sporting News in 1991… Named American League Fireman of the Year by the Sporting News in 1994…Named NL Co-Fireman of the Year by the Sporting News in 1983 and ‘92…Won the NL Rolaids Relief Award in 1991 and 1992 and AL Rolaids Relief Award in 1994…Finished 8th in 1991 NL MVP Award voting…Finished in Top 10 in NL Cy Young Award voting three times in 1983 (T9th), 1991 (2nd), and 1992 (4th)…Finished in Top 10 in AL Cy Young Award balloting in 1994 (5th)…Seven All-Star teams (1983, 1987, 1991-95), with a 5.40 ERA in five ASG innings…Led NL in saves three times (1983, ’91-92) and AL in saves once (1994)…Thirteen consecutive seasons with 20-plus saves (1983-‘95), 10 seasons with 30-plus saves, and three seasons with 40-plus saves…Holds Chicago Cubs all-time team record for most saves…Holds NL career record for most consecutive errorless games by a pitcher (546)…Two League Championship Series (1984, ’88); with one save in 5 1/3 LCS innings.

SAMMY SOSA

Seven-time All-Star won the 1998 NL MVP and finished in the Top 10 of league MVP voting six other times. Collected six Silver Slugger Awards in the outfield, and topped the 30-homer mark 11 times, including seven times with 40-or-more and three times with better than 60 home runs (1998-99, 2001). Paced the league three times in total bases, three times in runs scored, three times in games played, twice in homers and twice in RBI. Drove in 100-or-more runs nine times, scored 100-or-more runs five times and hit at least .300 in four full seasons. Ranks eighth all-time in home runs (609) and 28th all-time in RBI (1,667).


BBWAA Bio

4th year on ballot…Played 18 seasons with Rangers, White Sox, Cubs and Orioles…Seven-time All-Star (1995, 1998-2002, 2004) and six-time Silver Slugger Award winner in outfield (1995, 1998-2002)…Won 1998 National League Most Valuable Player Award and finished in Top 10 of NL MVP voting six other times: 1995 (8th), 1999 (9th), 2000 (9th), 2001 (2nd), 2002 (9th) and 2003 (8th)…Topped the 30-homer mark 11 times, including seven times with 40-or-more and three times with better than 60 home runs (1998-99, 2001)…Led NL in home runs twice (2000, 2002)…Drove in 100-or-more runs nine times (1995-2003), including leading the NL in RBI twice (1998, 2001)…Scored 100-or-more runs in five seasons (1998-2002), leading NL in runs scored three times (1998, 2001-02)…Led NL in total bases in three seasons (1998-99, 2001)…Led NL in games played in three seasons (1995, 1997, 1999)… Recorded at least a .300 batting average in four full seasons (1994, 1998, 2000-01)…Ranks eighth all-time in home runs (609), 27th all-time in RBI (1,667), 28th in extra-base hits (1,033) and 35th in total bases (4,704)…Led all NL right fielders in putouts three times (1990, 1995, 2001) and assists twice (1995, 1997)…Appeared in three postseason series, batting .245 with two home runs and seven RBI in 15 games…Won 1998 Roberto Clemente Award and 1999 NL Hank Aaron Award.

MIKE SWEENEY

Five-time All-Star at first base who collected six seasons with at least 20 home runs, five seasons batting at least .300, two seasons with at least 100 RBI and two seasons with at least 100 runs scored. Set Royals’ franchise mark with 144 RBI in 2000.


BBWAA Bio

1st year on ballot…Played 16 seasons with Royals, Athletics, Mariners and Phillies…Five-time All-Star (2000-03, 2005)…Batted .300-or-better five times (1999-2002, 2005), collected 100-or-more-RBI twice (1999, 2000) and scored 100-or-more runs twice (1999, 2000)….Hit 20-or-more home runs six times…Led American League catchers in double plays (1997), and later led AL first basemen in assists (2002)…Finished in AL Top Five in batting average once (2002-2nd), on-base percentage once (2002-4th), hits once (2000-3rd), doubles twice (1999-2nd, 2001-2nd), runs batted in once (2000-2nd) and sacrifice flies once (2000-2nd)…Set Royals club record with 144 RBI in 2000…Won the 2007 Hutch Award…Appeared in one postseason game with Phillies in 2010 NLDS, collecting a single in his lone at-bat.

ALAN TRAMMELL

Six-time All-Star shortstop who played all 20 seasons of his career with the Tigers. Collected seven seasons with a .300-or-better average, three seasons with 100-plus runs scored and one season with 100-plus RBI. Earned Top 10 placement in AL MVP voting three times. Won four AL Gold Glove Awards at shortstop, and led AL shortstops in double plays (102) in 1990. Named World Series MVP in 1984, when he batted .450 with six RBI and two HR in 20 at-bats to lead Tigers to the title. Also tied a Series record by driving in all four of his team’s runs in Game 4.


BBWAA Bio

15th and final year on the ballot…Played 20 seasons, all with the Detroit Tigers…Seven .300 batting average seasons, one season with 200-plus hits, one season with 100-plus RBI, and three seasons with 100-plus runs scored…Finished in Top 10 in MVP voting three times in 1984 (9th), 1987 (2nd) and 1988 (7th)…Named WS MVP in 1984; batted .450 with six RBI and two HR in 20 WS at-bats…Shares single-game WS record for driving in all of team’s runs (4) on Oct. 13, 1984…Six All-Star teams (1980, 1984-85, 1987-88, 1990)… Won four AL Gold Glove Awards (1980-81, 1983-84) at shortstop…Named 1983 AL Comeback Player of the Year by the Sporting News…Finished tied for 4th in the 1978 BBWAA AL Rookie of the Year Award voting…20-plus HR twice, 30-plus doubles six times, 20-plus stolen bases three times, and 30-plus stolen bases once…Five career grand slams…Had 20-game hitting streak (Aug. 5-22, 1984) and 21-game hitting streak (May 24-June 16, 1987)… Led AL in sacrifice hits in 1981 (16) and 1983 (15)… Led AL shortstops in double plays (102) in 1990… Two ALCS (1984, 1987); batted .258 with five RBI and one HR in 31 ALCS at-bats…One World Series (1984); member of 1984 WS championship team.

BILLY WAGNER

A 16-year veteran with the Astros, Phillies, Mets, Red Sox and Braves, recorded 422 career saves —the second-highest total among left-handed relievers and fifth-highest overall. The seven-time All-Star used a wipe-out slider to keep hitters at bay; his career walks plus hits per nine innings pitched (WHIP) ratio of 0.998 is the lowest mark of all-time among relievers with at least 500 innings pitched. His career 2.31 ERA is also extraordinary, as it’s the lowest among left-handers who have pitched at least 500 innings in the live-ball era.


BBWAA Bio

1st year on ballot…Pitched 16 seasons with Astros, Phillies, Mets, Red Sox and Braves…Finished Top 10 in NL Cy Young Award voting twice (1999-4th, 2006-6th)…Recorded 422 career saves, second-highest among left-handed relievers and fifth overall…Career walks plus hits per innings pitched ratio (WHIP) of 0.998 is lowest among all relievers with at least 500 innings pitched…Career 2.31 ERA is lowest among left-handed pitchers with at least 500 innings pitched in live-ball era…Seven-time All-Star (1999, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2007-08, 2010)…Won 1999 NL Rolaids Relief Award…Led NL in games finished twice (2003, 2005), and finished among league top five in saves four times (1999, 2003, 2006, 2010)…Set record (since surpassed) for highest single-season strikeout per nine innings rate among relievers (14.95) in 1999…Recorded 12 seasons with 20-plus saves, nine seasons with 30-or-more and two with 40-or more (2003, 2006)…Finished an historic no-hitter that included six Astros pitchers vs. Yankees on June 11, 2003…Pitched in eight career postseason series, posting a 1-1 record with 21 hits and 13 runs allowed, while striking out 13 in 11.2 innings…One League Championship Series with Mets (2006); with one save in 2.2 innings.

LARRY WALKER

Five-time All-Star outfielder won the 1997 NL MVP with Colorado after batting .366 and leading the NL in home runs (49), total bases (409, the 18th-best single-season total in history), on-base percentage (.452) and slugging percentage (.720). Also became just the 14th player in NL history to hit 30 home runs and steal 30 bases that season. Finished in the Top 10 in NL MVP voting in three other seasons (1992, 1995, 1999). Captured three batting titles, along with three Silver Slugger Awards. Also won seven Gold Glove Awards for his play in right field. Led NL in slugging percentage twice (1997 and 1999), and his .565 career mark ranks 12th all-time. Hit at least .300 in nine seasons, recorded 100-plus RBI in five seasons and scored 100-plus runs four times. Member of the 2004 Cardinals NL champion club.


BBWAA Bio

6th year on the ballot…Played 17 seasons with Expos, Rockies and Cardinals…Won 1997 National League Most Valuable Player Award, hitting .366 with NL-leading totals in home runs (49), total bases (409, the 18th-best single-season total in history), on-base percentage (.452) and slugging percentage (.720)…Led NL in batting three times: 1998 (.363), 1999 (.379) and 2001 (.350)…Won seven Gold Glove Awards (1992-93, 1997-99, 2001-02) and three Silver Slugger Awards (1992, 1997, 1999) as a outfielder…Finished seventh in 1990 NL Rookie of the Year Award voting with Expos…Named to five All-Star Games (1992, 1997-99, 2001)…Received NL Most Valuable Player Award votes in eight seasons, finishing in Top 10 four times: 1992 (5th), 1995 (7th), 1997 (1st), 1999 (10th)…Led NL in slugging percentage twice (1997 and 1999), and his .565 career mark ranks 12th all-time…Posted 30-homer/30-steal season in 1997 with 49 home runs and 33 stolen bases, becoming just the 14th different NL player to reach that milestone…Drove in at least 100 runs in five seasons (1995, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2002)…Hit better than .300 in nine seasons (1992, 1994-95, 1997-2002)…Scored 100-or-more runs in four seasons (1997-99, 2001)…In six postseason series, batted .230 with 18 runs scored, seven home runs and 15 RBI…Two NLCS with Cardinals (2004-05)…Member of Cardinals’ 2004 NL Championship team.

RANDY WINN

A 2002 All-Star selection in center field who went on to lead AL outfielders in putouts in 2004. Hit .300-or-better three times and posted a perfect 1.000 fielding percentage over 146 games in the outfield in 2009.


BBWAA Bio

1st year on the ballot…Played 13 seasons with Devil Rays, Mariners, Giants, Yankees and Cardinals…All-Star selection in 2002…Led AL outfielders in putouts in 2004…Finished in NL top five in hits once (2008) and sacrifice flies once (2008)…Hit .300-or-better three times (2005, 2007-08), and scored 100-or-more runs once (2003)…Career-high 20 home runs in 2005, and career-high 81 RBI in 2004…Posted perfect 1.000 fielding percentage in 146 games across all three outfield positions in 2009...Recorded 51 hits in Sept. 2005, tied for most hits in a calendar month in Giants history.

2015 BBWAA Voting Results

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Ballots Cast: 549 Needed for Election: 412

Votes Player Percentage
534 Randy Johnson 97.3%
500 Pedro Martinez 91.1%
455 John Smoltz 82.9%
454 Craig Biggio 82.7%
384 Mike Piazza 69.9%
306 Jeff Bagwell 55.7%
302 Tim Raines 55.0%
215 Curt Schilling 39.2%
206 Roger Clemens 37.5%
202 Barry Bonds 36.8%
166 Lee Smith 30.2%
148 Edgar Martinez 27.0%
138 Alan Trammell 25.1%
135 Mike Mussina 24.6%
77 Jeff Kent 14.0%
71 Fred McGriff 12.9%
65 Larry Walker 11.8%
64 Gary Sheffield 11.7%
55 Mark McGwire 10.0%
50 Don Mattingly 9.1%
36 Sammy Sosa 6.6%
30 Nomar Garciaparra 5.5%
21 Carlos Delgado 3.8%
4 Troy Percival 0.7%
2 Aaron Boone 0.4%
2 Tom Gordon 0.4%
1 Darin Erstad 0.2%
0 Rich Aurilia 0.0%
0 Tony Clark 0.0%
0 Jermaine Dye 0.0%
0 Cliff Floyd 0.0%
0 Brian Giles 0.0%
0 Eddie Guardado 0.0%
0 Jason Schmidt 0.0%

*All candidates in italics received less than 5% of the vote on ballots cast and will be removed from future BBWAA consideration

Hall of Fame Class of 2015

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Voting Rules

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From the Collection

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