Personality News

(NBHOF Library)

By Connor O’Gara

Baseball players are considered memorable if they achieved success in the city in which they played in.

Tony Fernandez, on the other hand, left his mark on three countries.

The San Pedro de Macoris, Dominican Republic native, spent his 17-year Major League career playing America’s game – and helped bring a World Series title to a hockey country. Fernandez’s road to international baseball success started when he was just a kid with a dream.

(NBHOF Library)

By Kimberly McCray

Pedro Cepeda, affectionately known as “Perucho” or “The Bull,” was not only father to a great ballplayer, Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda, but was a baseball star himself.

By Lindsey Hale

Born in Havana, Cuba, and raised in Florida, Angel Hernandez grew up watching his dad umpire baseball games. In 1993, Hernandez followed in his father’s footsteps and beyond, becoming one of the first Hispanic Major League Baseball umpires.

(NBHOF Library)

By Cassidy Lent 

Fernando Valenzuela was a nineteen-year-old native from Navojoa, Sonora, Mexico, who had only been in the United States for two years when he entered the major leagues with the Los Angeles Dodgers. He was a September call-up in 1980 and pitched 17 2/3 innings without giving up an earned run. 

Twelve months later, Fernandomania took the baseball world by storm. And Valenzuela became an overnight sensation. 

(NBHOF Library)

By Laurel Camean 

In the 1940s, World War II caused major league ball players to hang up their cleats and enter military service. Legendary Chicago Cubs owner Phillip Wrigley sought to fill this void in American culture, by establishing the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGPBL) in 1943 with teams from Indiana, Illinois, and Wisconsin. 

Historically, baseball had mostly been a white gentleman’s game, but the AAGPBL fostered diversity and acceptance of Latino culture into the United States. 

(NBHOF Library)

By Kimberly McCray

Venezuela has sent almost 300 players to the big leagues.  Yet of all the players hailing from the small South American nation, a select group of high-profile shortstops are Venezuela’s most successful exports. Glove men like Omar Vizquel, Dave Concepcion, Ozzie Guillen and Hall of Famer Luis Aparicio top the list of the position six players that are the pride of the nation.   

(NBHOF Library)

By Connor O’Gara 

Willie Hernandez was part of a baseball revolution in the 1980s. No longer was a starting pitcher expected to finish his battles. Instead, specialty hurlers were called upon in relief to close out games in the late innings. Few executed this new closer position as well as Hernandez, especially in 1984. 

(NBHOF Library)

By Kimberly McCray

Almost one third of all major leaguers have a Latino heritage. And among Latin American countries, the Dominican Republic has produced more Latino baseball talent than any other.

By Connor O’Gara

All nine players on a baseball field impact the game in a different way. Some do it with stellar defense, some do it with steady power in the middle of the lineup and others make their presence felt on the mound.

Epy Guerrero, on the other hand, made his presence felt outside the white lines by discovering those players. The Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic native revolutionized Major League Baseball scouting in a career that spanned four decades.

By Lindsey Hale

The Little League World Series is held every year in Williamsport, Pa., and teams from the all over the world compete to play for the championship.

In 1957, Angel Macias led Mexico to the championship – the first international team to claim the title.

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