Personality News

2013 BBWAA Hall of Fame Candidate Royce Clayton (NBHOF Library)

Royce Clayton challenged himself to be great.

And after 17 big league seasons, Clayton finds himself on the verge of joining the greatest collection of baseball players ever assembled at the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Clayton is one of 37 players on the 2013 Baseball Writers’ Association of America ballot for the Class of 2013 at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Clayton is making his debut on the ballot.

2013 BBWAA Hall of Fame Candidate Jeff Cirillo (NBHOF Library)

Jeff Cirillo was always his own toughest critic.

But in the end, a .296 career batting average in 14 big league seasons doesn’t leave a lot to complain about.

Cirillo is one of 37 players on the 2013 Baseball Writers’ Association of America ballot for the Class of 2013 at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Cirillo is making his debut on the ballot.

2013 BBWAA Hall of Fame Candidate Barry Bonds (Brad Mangin/NBHOF Library)

On the baseball diamond, there was nothing Barry Bonds could not do.

The totals: 2,935 hits, a record 2,558 walks and a .444 on-base percentage. Five-hundred fourteen stolen bases, and the lone member of the 500 steal/500 home run club. Eight Gold Glove Awards in left field.

He recorded seven National League Most Valuable Player Awards – including four straight from 2001-04 – and 14 All-Star Game selections.

And a record 762 home runs.

Now, Bonds finds himself on the Baseball Writers’ Association of America Hall of Fame ballot for the first time.

2013 BBWAA Hall of Fame Candidate Craig Biggio (Michael Ponzini/NBHOF Library)

Craig Biggio’s path to big league stardom took him from high school football standout to a position change many in baseball thought was all but impossible.

Along the way, Biggio amassed seven All-Star Game selections, 3,060 hits and the admiration of fans and teammates.

Today, he stands on the brink of the game’s greatest achievement: The Hall of Fame.

2013 BBWAA Hall of Fame Candidate Jeff Bagwell (Brad Mangin/NBHOF Library)

The story is so famous, it has become the first cautionary tale for every new big league general manager.

The Boston Red Sox, desperate for bullpen help during the 1990 stretch drive, target the Astros’ Larry Andersen – a 37-year-old veteran of four teams who has posted earned-run averages below 2.00 for each of the two previous seasons.

2013 BBWAA Hall of Fame Candidate Sandy Alomar, Jr. (NBHOF Library)

Baseball never came easy for Sandy Alomar Jr. But success evolved through more than 40 years of hard work and determination.

It was a work ethic that led Alomar to an indelible place in the game’s history – and to the edge of Cooperstown and the Hall of Fame.

“It’s not that I’m that bad, I’m just not The Natural,” said Alomar during his playing days. “There were at least three players on my Little League team better than me.”

2013 Pre-Integration Committee candidate Deacon White. (NBHOF Library)

Deacon White stopped playing big league before the dawn of the 20th Century. But his  accomplishments still shine brightly enough to merit consideration at the Hall of Fame.

White, a catcher and third baseman who played from 1871-1890, is one of 10 finalists on this year’s Pre-Integration Committee ballot at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. The Pre-Integration Committee will vote on Dec. 2 at baseball’s Winter Meetings in Nashville, Tenn., and the results of the vote will be announced Dec. 3.

2013 Pre-Integration Committee candidate Bucky Walters. (NBHOF Library)

Bucky Walters didn’t become a full-time big league pitcher until he was 27 years old. But he quickly made up for the lost time.

Now, Walters could take his place with baseball’s all-time greats at the Hall of Fame.

Walters is one of 10 finalists on this year’s Pre-Integration Committee ballot at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. The Pre-Integration Committee will vote on Dec. 2 at baseball’s Winter Meetings in Nashville, Tenn., and the results of the vote will be announced Dec. 3.

2013 Pre-Integration Committee candidate Jacob Ruppert. (NBHOF Library)

The greatest sports dynasty in American history began with a second-division team in the country’s premier city.

Jacob Ruppert changed all that when he bought the New York Yankees in 1915. Baseball has never been the same.

“For $450,000, we got an orphan ballclub,” said Ruppert, who purchased the team with Tillinghast Huston. “(The club was) without a home of its own, without players of outstanding ability, without prestige.”

Within a decade, Ruppert had built Yankee Stadium, acquired Babe Ruth and won the first of the franchise’s record 27 World Series titles.

Vernon Lefty Gomez baffled the opposition with a blazing fastball and sweeping curve, while entertaining teammates with his wit and good humor. (NBHOF Library)

Vernona Gomez always had the memories of her father. But in writing a book about Hall of Famer Lefty Gomez, Vernona discovered a treasure trove of artifacts he left behind.

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