Personality News

2013 Pre-Integration Committee candidate Al Reach. (NBHOF Library)

While Al Reach was considered one of the best baseball players of the 19th century, it was his contributions to the game as both an executive and as an innovative sporting goods magnate that many consider his greatest accomplishments.

In a real life rags-to-riches tale, Reach was brought to America as an infant but eventually embraced his adopted country’s national pastime. Though he experienced bumps along the way, his business acumen would eventually help him build a multimillion dollar empire and become one of the more famous men of his time.

2013 Pre-Integration Committee candidate Hank O'Day. (NBHOF Library)

A player, manager, umpire and scout for over 40 years in the National League, Hank O’Day remains the only person to serve the league in so many capacities.

But a call he made on one play in 1908 may be his greatest legacy.

O’Day is one of 10 finalists on this year’s Pre-Integration Committee ballot at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. The Pre-Integration Committee will vote on Dec. 2 at baseball’s Winter Meetings in Nashville, Tenn., and the results of the vote will be announced Dec. 3.

2013 Pre-Integration Committee candidate Tony Mullane. (NBHOF Library)

Tony Mullane, one of the most famous pitchers of his time, was a bright star in the baseball world before the turn of the century.

During a 13-year big league career spent during the 1880s and 1890s, Mullane compiled a 284-220 record with Detroit, Cincinnati, Baltimore and Cleveland of the National League and Louisville, St. Louis, Toledo and Cincinnati of the American Association (then considered a major league). Ultimately, though, it was with Cincinnati where Mullane enjoyed his greatest success, winning 163 games during his eight years in The Queen City.

2013 Pre-Integration Committee candidate Marty Marion. (NBHOF Library)

Tall and skinny, Marty Marion did not fit the look of the prototypical shortstop from the mid-20th century. But the player once described as “built like a floor lamp” was such an agile fielder that he was considered by many to be the most vital cog of the 1940s St. Louis Cardinals dynasty.

2013 Pre-Integration Committee candidate Wes Ferrell. (NBHOF Library)

On the rubber or at the plate, Wes Ferrell was a star.

Ferrell, recognized as one of the 20th Century’s top hitting pitchers and known for his fierce competition and passion, is one of 10 finalists on this year’s Pre-Integration Committee ballot at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. The Pre-Integration Committee will vote on Dec. 2 at baseball’s Winter Meetings in Nashville, Tenn., and the results of the vote will be announced Dec. 3.

2013 Pre-Integration Committee candidate Bill Dahlen. (NBHOF Library)

For some players, time can dim their accomplishments. But for turn-of-the-century shortstop Bill Dahlen, the passage of years has brought attention to his remarkable career.

Today, Dahlen stands one step away from the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Dahlen is one of 10 finalists on this year’s Pre-Integration Committee ballot at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. The Pre-Integration Committee will vote on Dec. 2 at baseball’s Winter Meetings in Nashville, Tenn., and the results of the vote will be announced Dec. 3.

2013 Pre-Integration Committee candidate Sam Breadon. (NBHOF Library)

Sam Breadon made his early mark as a pioneer in the automobile industry.

His lasting legacy, however, remains the success of the St Louis Cardinals.

Breadon, who owned the St. Louis Cardinals for three decades between 1917 and 1947, is one of 10 finalists on this year’s Pre-Integration Committee ballot at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. The Pre-Integration Committee will vote on Dec. 2 at baseball’s Winter Meetings in Nashville, Tenn., and the results of the vote will be announced Dec. 3.

NBHOF Library

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. – He spent his life’s work out of the spotlight, building champions behind the scenes. But history will always regard Lee MacPhail as a member of one of baseball’s most famous families.

(NBHOF Library)

By Nadia Stennes-Spidahl

Zoilo Versalles was born in Havana, Cuba in 1939.  Twenty-six years later, in 1965, Versalles became the first Latino baseball player to win his league’s Most Valuable Player Award after leading the Minnesota Twins to their first AL pennant. 

An acrobatic shortstop and productive hitter, he was an All-Star in 1963 and 1965, and voted first choice for American League MVP on 19 of 20 ballots in 1965.  (The other first-place vote went to his teammate, Tony Oliva).

By Jacob Fishbein 

The National Association of Professional Base Ball Players came in 1871 – and is recognized by many as the first “major league.” 

That year, Esteban Bellán became the first Latin player to appear in a big league game. 

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