Personality News

2013 Pre-Integration Committee candidate Wes Ferrell. (NBHOF Library)

On the rubber or at the plate, Wes Ferrell was a star.

Ferrell, recognized as one of the 20th Century’s top hitting pitchers and known for his fierce competition and passion, is one of 10 finalists on this year’s Pre-Integration Committee ballot at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. The Pre-Integration Committee will vote on Dec. 2 at baseball’s Winter Meetings in Nashville, Tenn., and the results of the vote will be announced Dec. 3.

2013 Pre-Integration Committee candidate Bill Dahlen. (NBHOF Library)

For some players, time can dim their accomplishments. But for turn-of-the-century shortstop Bill Dahlen, the passage of years has brought attention to his remarkable career.

Today, Dahlen stands one step away from the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Dahlen is one of 10 finalists on this year’s Pre-Integration Committee ballot at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. The Pre-Integration Committee will vote on Dec. 2 at baseball’s Winter Meetings in Nashville, Tenn., and the results of the vote will be announced Dec. 3.

2013 Pre-Integration Committee candidate Sam Breadon. (NBHOF Library)

Sam Breadon made his early mark as a pioneer in the automobile industry.

His lasting legacy, however, remains the success of the St Louis Cardinals.

Breadon, who owned the St. Louis Cardinals for three decades between 1917 and 1947, is one of 10 finalists on this year’s Pre-Integration Committee ballot at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. The Pre-Integration Committee will vote on Dec. 2 at baseball’s Winter Meetings in Nashville, Tenn., and the results of the vote will be announced Dec. 3.

NBHOF Library

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. – He spent his life’s work out of the spotlight, building champions behind the scenes. But history will always regard Lee MacPhail as a member of one of baseball’s most famous families.

(NBHOF Library)

By Nadia Stennes-Spidahl

Zoilo Versalles was born in Havana, Cuba in 1939.  Twenty-six years later, in 1965, Versalles became the first Latino baseball player to win his league’s Most Valuable Player Award after leading the Minnesota Twins to their first AL pennant. 

An acrobatic shortstop and productive hitter, he was an All-Star in 1963 and 1965, and voted first choice for American League MVP on 19 of 20 ballots in 1965.  (The other first-place vote went to his teammate, Tony Oliva).

By Jacob Fishbein 

The National Association of Professional Base Ball Players came in 1871 – and is recognized by many as the first “major league.” 

That year, Esteban Bellán became the first Latin player to appear in a big league game. 

(NBHOF Library)

By Amanda Rodriguez 

Hector Lopez broke barriers on and off the field in a big league career that saw him become a national hero in his home country of Panama. 

Before making a name for himself with the great New York Yankees teams of the early 1960s, Lopez established himself as the first ever Panamanian starter in the major leagues. This was achieved in 1955 when Lopez joined the Kansas City Athletics. 

(NBHOF Library)

By Connor O’Gara

(NBHOF Library)

By Connor O’Gara

Ozzie Virgil Sr. is not remembered for his 14 career home runs and .231 batting average. He isn’t remembered for his ability to play nearly every position on the field. And Virgil isn’t remembered for his 19-year coaching career after his playing days were over.  

That’s because Virgil’s place in baseball history trumps any sort of measurable statistic. 

Virgil was not only the first non-white player to ever suit up for the Detroit Tigers, he was also the first Dominican Republic native to ever play in the major leagues. 

(NBHOF Library)

By Cassidy Lent 

Orlando Hernandez entered the big leagues to great fanfare after defecting from his Cuban home. 

And El Duque lived up to the advance billing. 

After establishing himself as a major star in the Cuban leagues and leading Cuba to the gold medal at the 1992 Olympics in Barcelona, Spain, Hernandez defected to Costa Rica and eventually the United States in 1997. He quickly signed a four-year, $6.6 million contract with the Yankees. 

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