Museum News

The Buck O'Neil Award was established in 2008. (Sparks/National Baseball Hall of Fame Library)

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. – His likeness greets thousands of visitors a week at the Baseball Hall of Fame, with a smile on his face and a Kansas City Monarchs cap in hand.

John Jordan O’Neil’s legacy is alive in Cooperstown. And the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum’s Buck O’Neil Award is an unflagging reminder of what its namesake meant to baseball.

“He paved the way for so many people, both as a player in the Negro leagues and as a coach,” said Hall of Famer Dave Winfield during the O’Neil Award dedication in 2008. “This is a fitting tribute.”

Ernie Harwell won the Ford C. Frick Award in 1981. (National Baseball Hall of Fame Library)

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. – For two generations of fans, Ernie Harwell was the Detroit Tigers.

His legacy lives on in Cooperstown.

Harwell died Tuesday following a battle with cancer. He was 92.

Harwell spent 55 years broadcasting Major League Baseball, the last 42 with the Tigers before retiring after the 2002 season. In 1981, Harwell became just the fifth recipient of the Ford C. Frick Award, given annually by the Baseball Hall of Fame since 1978 to a broadcaster to recognize major contributions to baseball.

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. – Quite possibly the most famous marketing concept in history, baseball cards will be forever recognized as a timeless phenomenon in its relationship to the game and its fans.

The phenomenon continues today – and shows no sign of abating. For unlike other collectibles, baseball cards also enthrall the men and women who play the games and run the teams.

This headshot of Norma Metrolis is among the 323 photos her family donated to the Baseball Hall of Fame. (National Baseball Hall of Fame Library)

Photo Gallery of images from the Norma Metrolis Collection

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. – When players, teams and fans donate artifacts to the Baseball Hall of Fame, it is often a difficult decision.

The donors trust the Hall of Fame to preserve these items for eternity and allow thousands of baseball fans to view their items each year. That is why the Hall of Fame is so grateful that so many generous people make donations to its collection.

Yankees artifacts from the 2009 World Series are on display in the Autumn Glory exhibit. (Milo Stewart Jr./National Baseball Hall of Fame Library)

COOPERSTOWN, NY – As the New York Yankees celebrate their record 27th World Series championship, treasures from the baseball’s most memorable moments from the 2009 postseason are now on display in the Autumn Glory exhibit at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown.

Following the Yankees’ World Series-clinching win on Nov. 4, the Museum acquired nearly a dozen artifacts from the both the Bronx Bombers and the Phillies. Artifacts donated by the Yankees from the 105th World Series include:

Hank Aaron: Chasing the Dream opened in April of 2009. (Milo Stewart Jr./National Baseball Hall of Fame Library)

COOPERSTOWN, NY – Hank Aaron brought history to life on Saturday at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. And the fans – some of whom weren’t even born when Aaron played his last big league game – came out to show their appreciation.

Aaron thrilled an overflow crowd at the opening of Hank Aaron: Chasing the Dream, the Hall of Fame’s historic new exhibit chronicling Aaron’s life, from childhood through his big league career and post-baseball career, including his vast philanthropic efforts.

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