Gary Carter

Gary Edmund Carter
Inducted to the Hall of Fame in: 2003
Primary team: Montreal Expos
Primary position: Catcher

Gary Carter earned the nickname “The Kid” at Expos training camp in 1973 at the age of 19.

“I tried to impress everybody that spring, you know, being the first in line for sprints,” Carter said. “Running hard to first base all the time.”

A few big leaguers began calling him the kid – and the nickname as well as the style of play stuck with him throughout his 19-year career. The 11-time All-Star was an enthusiastic and resilient backstop for the Expos, Mets, Giants and Dodgers who helped his teams behind the plate and in the batter’s box.

“He’s a horse,” said Mets Manager Davey Johnson. “He’s in great shape. You try to rest him during the season, but he won’t stand for it.”

Born on April 8, 1954 in Culver City, Calif., Carter played baseball, basketball and football in high school, but rejected dozens of college scholarships to sign with the Montreal Expos. Used primarily as an outfielder during his 1975 rookie season, Carter came in second in Rookie of the Year voting before earning the full-time catching job in 1977.

“I was out of position. I was running into walls and hurting myself,” said Carter about his experience in the outfield.

A three-time Gold Glove Award winner, Carter set a record for fewest past balls in 1978 and paced all National League catchers in total chances (1977-82), putouts (1977-80, 1982), assists (1977, 1979-80, 1982) and double plays (1978-79, 1983).

"He was a human backstop back there,” said former teammate Keith Hernandez. “Early, before his knees went bad, you couldn't steal on him in Montreal. When he wasn't able to throw because of his knees, that never affected his performance. He was running on and off the field after three outs. This guy played in some pain and it was hustle, hustle, hustle."

Carter was traded to the Mets in 1984. He led his team to a World Series Championship, hitting .276 with two home runs and nine RBI in the Fall Classic. His two-out, 10th-inning single ignited a three-run rally that resulted in a Mets’ win to even the series. New York went onto win the Fall Classic in seven games.

Slowed by injuries, Carter played for the Giants and Dodgers before returning to Montreal to end his career in 1992. He had a career .262 batting average, belted 324 home runs and knocked in 1,225 runs to earn four Silver Sluggers.

"It is a grueling position (catching),” said Carter. “I can look back at it and say it's worth it to be enshrined in Cooperstown. I don't have any pain in my knees right now."

Carter was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2003.

"He’s an animal. He’s a tiger. If you tell him to run through this wall, he’ll do it. His body may say no, but he won’t say no. He’d still catch all 162 games if they let him. The young guys here can learn a lesson from Gary Carter,. "
Mets strength coach Keith Cedro, 1988

Career stats

ESSENTIAL STATS
Year Inducted: 2003
Primary Team: Montreal Expos
Position Played: Catcher
Bats: Right
Throws: Right
Birth place: Culver City, California
Birth year: 1954
Died: 2012, West Palm Beach, Florida
Played for:
Montreal Expos (1974-1984)
New York Mets (1985-1989)
San Francisco Giants (1990)
Los Angeles Dodgers (1991)
Montreal Expos (1992)
CAREER AT A GLANCE
GamesG
2296
At BatsAB
7971
RunsR
1025
HitsH
2092
Doubles2B
371
Triples3B
31
Home RunsHR
324
RBIRBI
1225
Stolen BasesSB
39
WalksBB
848
Batting AverageBA
.262
OPSOPS
.773
On Base %OBP
.335
Slugging %SLG
.439