Cox, Bobby

Robert Joseph Cox
Born: May 21, 1941, Tulsa, Oklahoma
Bats: 
Right
Throws: 
Right
Played For: 
New York Yankees (1968-1969)
Elected to the Hall of Fame by Veterans Committee: 2014
Biography: 

 

Managed For: Atlanta Braves (1978-1981), Toronto Blue Jays (1982-1985), Atlanta Braves (1990-2010)

Although Bobby Cox’s playing days were cut short by injuries, he set out on a trail that led him to a long and successful career as one of the game’s most highly regarded managers.

In an amazing run, Cox, the one-time infielder, would skipper big league teams for three decades, accumulating more than 2,500 victories by the time he retired after the 2010 season. But his greatest accomplishments came during his second stint with the Atlanta Braves, when he led the franchise to 14 straight division crowns and a World Series title.

Born May 21, 1941 in Tulsa, Okla., Cox graduated from Selma High School in California’s San Joaquin Valley before signing with the Los Angeles Dodgers as an amateur free agent in 1959. As a minor leaguer, splitting his time between second and third base, Cox spent five seasons in the Dodgers’ farm system before being selected by the Cubs in the November 1964 minor league draft. After being traded to the Braves in April 1966, Cox was acquired by the Yankees after the 1967 season, where he made his big league debut in 1968.

After two seasons as a big league third baseman with the Yankees, bad knees would eventually force Cox to retire as a player. But a career as a manager beckoned, and Cox progressed rapidly.

The 30-year-old Cox began his managerial career in the Yankees’ farm system with Fort Lauderdale of the Florida State League in 1971. After a season with West Haven in the Eastern League, he skippered Syracuse for four seasons, winning the International League’s Governor’s Cup in 1976 before serving as the Yankees’ first base coach in their championship season of 1977.

After 10 years with the Yankees as a player, a minor league manager and a big league coach, Cox became Atlanta’s eighth manager in 12 years in December 1977. Of the 36-year-old, who was two years younger than Braves pitcher Phil Niekro and became the youngest manager in the National League, Braves owner Ted Turner said Cox was picked “because we have a young team and wanted someone who was young and had his future ahead instead of behind him.”

Of his managing philosophy, Cox said, “I’m my own manager. I have no ‘book’ on the subject; I don’t pattern myself after anybody especially.

“I hope to work hard as I can and not put pressure on the players. I think I can handle ballplayers at the major league level just as I did in the minor leagues. There’s not that much difference. It’s still a young man’s game.”

Cox’s first stint managing the Braves would last from 1978 to 1981, resulting in a 266-323 record. When Turner was asked at a 1981 press conference who the likely next manager of the Braves would be, he replied, “It would be Bobby Cox if I hadn’t just fired him. We need someone like him around here.”

After four years managing the Toronto Blue Jays, which included leading the young franchise to 99 wins and to within one game of attaining a World Series berth in 1985, Cox returned to Atlanta as general manager in October 1985. After overseeing a farm system that would lay the foundation for future success, he also became Atlanta’s manager on June 22, 1990. Cox was able to devote all his time to managing when John Schuerholz was named GM of the Braves in October 1990.

Starting in 1991, the Braves began a remarkable string of 14 consecutive division crowns that led to five National League pennants (1991, 1992, 1995, 1996 and 1999) and in 1995 the first professional sports world championship for the city of Atlanta.

A hallmark of this era in Braves history was the starting pitching trio of Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine and John Smoltz. During Cox’s tenure as their manager, the Braves won six NL Cy Young awards – Maddux’s three, Glavine’s two, Smoltz’s one.

“(Cox) was the single greatest influence on me as a player, in terms of teaching the game, respecting the game, carrying yourself the right way on and off the field,” Glavine said. “All that stuff was important. He was very much like a fatherly figure in that regard.”

“A small part of Bobby Cox changes you as a baseball player,” Smoltz said. “Twenty years with the man changes your life.”

Known as a “players’” manager, Cox treated his players the way he’d want to be treated.

“I played for a lot of different managers and been around all through the leagues, and some I didn’t care to play for at all. I didn’t want to be one of those guys,” Cox said. “When you get the reputation as a players’ manager, players have got to put out. If I’m fair with them, they’ll give me everything they got.”

Cox retired from managing at the conclusion of the 2010 campaign, having spent 29 seasons as a big league skipper. His 2,504 wins rank fifth all-time and include a franchise-best 2,149 victories with the Braves.

“I’m proud that I played for one of the best managers a player could ever ask to play for,” said Braves pitcher Tim Hudson. “He’s a manager that feels like a teammate, a friend and a father figure. That’s not something many people can say they’ve done in their major league career. I think everybody in this clubhouse is really lucky to say that.”

Voted the Manager of the Year by the Baseball Writers Association of America four times (1985 with Toronto and 1991, 2004 and 2005 with Atlanta), Cox was also honored by the Sporting News, in a poll of his peers, as the league's top skipper eight times.

“If I was a ballplayer,” said umpire Bob Davidson, who was responsible for six of Cox’s big league record 158 ejections, “I’d want to play for Bobby Cox.”

On June 8, 2009, Cox posted his 2,000th Braves victory, making him just the fourth skipper in big-league history to claim 2,000 wins with one team, joining Connie Mack (Athletics), John McGraw(Giants) and Walter Alston (Dodgers).

“He never played an inning for the Atlanta Braves,” said longtime Braves player Chipper Jones. “He never threw a pitch and he never got a hit. But he was responsible for 2,000-plus wins.”

According to Cox, the secret of his success as a manager was good players: “We’ve had good players here forever. Whatever little success I’ve had, that would be the key.”

Rk Year Age Tm Lg W L W-L% G Finish
1 1978 37 Atlanta Braves NL 69 93 .426 162 6
2 1979 38 Atlanta Braves NL 66 94 .413 160 6
3 1980 39 Atlanta Braves NL 81 80 .503 161 4
4 1981 40 Atlanta Braves NL 25 29 .463 55 4
5 1981 40 Atlanta Braves NL 25 27 .481 52 5
                   
6 1982 41 Toronto Blue Jays AL 78 84 .481 162 6
7 1983 42 Toronto Blue Jays AL 89 73 .549 162 4
8 1984 43 Toronto Blue Jays AL 89 73 .549 163 2
9 1985 44 Toronto Blue Jays AL 99 62 .615 161 1
                   
10 1990 49 Atlanta Braves NL 40 57 .412 97 6
11 1991 50 Atlanta Braves NL 94 68 .580 162 1
12 1992 51 Atlanta Braves NL 98 64 .605 162 1
13 1993 52 Atlanta Braves NL 104 58 .642 162 1
14 1994 53 Atlanta Braves NL 68 46 .596 114 2
15 1995 54 Atlanta Braves NL 90 54 .625 144 1
16 1996 55 Atlanta Braves NL 96 66 .593 162 1
17 1997 56 Atlanta Braves NL 101 61 .623 162 1
18 1998 57 Atlanta Braves NL 106 56 .654 162 1
19 1999 58 Atlanta Braves NL 103 59 .636 162 1
20 2000 59 Atlanta Braves NL 95 67 .586 162 1
21 2001 60 Atlanta Braves NL 88 74 .543 162 1
22 2002 61 Atlanta Braves NL 101 59 .631 161 1
23 2003 62 Atlanta Braves NL 101 61 .623 162 1
24 2004 63 Atlanta Braves NL 96 66 .593 162 1
25 2005 64 Atlanta Braves NL 90 72 .556 162 1
26 2006 65 Atlanta Braves NL 79 83 .488 162 3
27 2007 66 Atlanta Braves NL 84 78 .519 162 3
28 2008 67 Atlanta Braves NL 72 90 .444 162 4
29 2009 68 Atlanta Braves NL 86 76 .531 162 3
30 2010 69 Atlanta Braves NL 91 71 .562 162 2
      Toronto Blue Jays   355 292 .549 648 3.3
      Atlanta Braves   2149 1709 .557 3860 2.4
          2504 2001 .556 4508 2.5

 

Did You Know: 
that Bobby Cox was the first base coach for the 1977 World Champion New York Yankees.