Herb Pennock

Herbert Jefferis Pennock
Inducted to the Hall of Fame in: 1948
Primary team: New York Yankees
Primary position: Pitcher

“I’ m going to pitch (Herb) Pennock in spots this season - the tough ones," said Joe McCarthy, Hall of Fame Yankees manager.

Pennock saw plenty of tough spots during his 22-year career. He was a part of three championship teams with the Yankees and was a perfect 5-0 with a 1.95 ERA in five World Series trips. He pitched well in the regular season as well, finishing with a 241-162 record. The lanky left-hander was the youngest player in the American League when he made his MLB debut with the Philadelphia Athletics in 1912 at 18 years old. Pennock played sparingly in the first few years of his career, largely because of the A’s star-laden teams. When Connie Mack split the dynasty up in 1914, Pennock became the ace. He nearly threw an Opening Day no-hitter in 1915, but soon found himself on Mack’s bad side and was shipped to the Boston Red Sox midway through the year. In Boston, Pennock again found himself on an older team and was seldom used until after he returned from his role with the Navy in World War I. Upon his return, Pennock went 16-8 with a 2.71 ERA in 1919 for the Red Sox.

Pennock was sold to the Yankees in 1923, heralded as the final piece that would bring a World Series to the Bronx. In his first season in New York, Pennock went 19-6, the best winning percentage in the league, and won two games and saved another in the Yankees’ first World Series championship. It was the start of a brilliant six-year stretch for Pennock. From 1923-28, Pennock went 115-57 with a 3.03 ERA. In those six years, he twice led the AL in WHIP, led baseball in shutouts once and received MVP votes for three straight seasons. While Pennock was not the most overpowering pitcher, he prided himself on his command and rag-arm style, able to throw pitches from many different release points. After retiring in 1934, Pennock became general manager of the Philadelphia Phillies and was the architect behind the 1950 “Whiz Kids” that reached the World Series. Pennock, however, was not alive to see it. He died of a stroke in 1948.

"I am going to pitch Pennock in spots this season -- the tough ones. "
Joe McCarthy

Career stats

ESSENTIAL STATS
Year Inducted: 1948
Primary Team: New York Yankees
Position Played: Pitcher
Bats: Both
Throws: Left
Birth place: Kennett Square, Pennsylvania
Birth year: 1894
Died: 1948, New York, New York
Played for:
Philadelphia Athletics (1912-1915)
Boston Red Sox (1915-1917)
Boston Red Sox (1919-1922)
Boston Red Sox (1934)
New York Yankees (1923-1933)
CAREER AT A GLANCE
GamesG
617
HitsH
3900
RunsR
1699
Innings PitchedIP
3571.2
WinsW
241
LossesL
162
Winning %Winning %
.598
Games StartedGS
419
ERAERA
3.60
Complete GamesCG
249
ShutoutsSHO
35
WHIPWHIP
1.348
SavesSV
37
Earned RunsER
1428
WalksBB
916
StrikeoutsSO
1227