Early Wynn

Early Wynn
Inducted to the Hall of Fame in: 1972
Primary team: Cleveland Indians
Primary position: Pitcher

One of the greatest hitters of all time, Ted Williams, once called fellow Hall of Famer Early Wynn “the toughest pitcher I ever faced.” Undoubtedly, the Splendid Splinter’s sentiment was shared by many big league hitters for more than two decades.

Wynn combined his physical gifts with intimidation and determination to overcome early struggles and become one of the most dominant players of his era. “Since the first time I saw my father play semipro ball in Alabama, it has been my greatest ambition and desire to be a big league ballplayer,” Wynn once said.

It was during Wynn’s early years with the Senators that he began to gain a reputation for meanness on the mound, exemplified by his willingness to knock down a batter if the occasion warranted. Among his famous quotes concerning this subject are: “A pitcher has to look at the hitter as his mortal enemy,” “A pitcher will never be a big winner until he hates hitters,” and “I’ve got a right to knock down anybody holding a bat.”

After nine seasons with mediocre Washington teams, in which he had a 72-87 mark, Wynn was traded with first baseman Mickey Vernon to the Indians prior to 1949.

“We were roommates and good friends,” Vernon would recall years later. “After I was traded back to Washington, I got four hits off him the first time I faced him, the last one knocking the glove off his hand. When I got to first base, he was steaming. He looked over and said, ‘Roommate or not, you’ve got to go in the dirt seat next time I see you.’ Sure enough, the next time I faced him, the first pitch was up over my head – to let me know he hadn’t forgotten.”

The move to Cleveland, where he teamed up with Bob Feller, Bob Lemon and Mike Garcia to give the team one of baseball’s great pitching rotations, proved fortuitous for Wynn. But after compiling a 163-100 record for the Indians from 1949-57, was traded to the White Sox. In 1959, at age 39, Wynn led the league in wins (22), was named the Cy Young Award winner, and helped pitch the White Sox to the 1959 pennant.

Wynn finished the 1962 season with 299 career wins, but was released by the White Sox after the season. After signing with the Indians, the 43-year-old posted his 300th win on July 13, 1963, becoming the 14th hurler in major league history to achieve the milestone.

Wynn, who pitched in four different decades, finished his big league pitching career with a record of 300-244, struck out 2,334 batters in 4,564 innings, and had an earned run average of 3.54. He won at least 20 games in a season five times, was named an All-Star every season from 1955-60, and when he finally retired in 1963 he had pitched longer than anyone else in baseball history.

"Thick set, gristle-bearded, 200 pounds of malevolence toward all who entered the batter’s box. "
J. Astor

Career stats

ESSENTIAL STATS
Year Inducted: 1972
Primary Team: Cleveland Indians
Position Played: Pitcher
Bats: Both
Throws: Right
Birth place: Hartford, Alabama
Birth year: 1920
Died: 1999, Venice, Florida
Played for:
Washington Senators (1939-1944)
Washington Senators (1946-1948)
Cleveland Indians (1949-1957)
Cleveland Indians (1963)
Chicago White Sox (1958-1962)
CAREER AT A GLANCE
GamesG
691
HitsH
4291
RunsR
2037
Innings PitchedIP
4564
WinsW
300
LossesL
244
Winning %Winning %
.551
Games StartedGS
611
ERAERA
3.54
Complete GamesCG
289
ShutoutsSHO
49
WHIPWHIP
1.329
SavesSV
15
Earned RunsER
1796
WalksBB
1775
StrikeoutsSO
2334