Philadelphia Phillies

From the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum’s collection containing tens of thousands of artifacts, our curators have created each team’s Starting Nine by hand-picking nine must-see pieces for each of the 30 MLB teams. This limited-time list is the perfect introduction to the Museum for every Philadelphia Phillies fan.

Don’t wait to make your visit to Cooperstown to take the Hall of Fame Starting Nine challenge, as this program is only available through December 2020.

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Eric Bruntlett: Triple Play Jersey

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Phillies second baseman Eric Bruntlett wore this jersey at New York’s Citi Field on Aug. 23, 2009, when he became just the second major league player to turn an unassisted triple play to end a ball game, as the Phillies topped the Mets, 9-7.

Steve Carlton: Strikeout Record Glove

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Wearing this glove on July 6, 1980, Phillies southpaw Steve Carlton notched a fourth-inning strikeout of Cardinals outfielder Tony Scott to become the all-time strikeout king among left-handed pitchers, breaking the mark of 2,832 Ks held by Mickey Lolich. Although Randy Johnson later surpassed this record, "Lefty" ended his career with a whopping 4,136 strikeouts.

Roy Halladay: Perfect Game Baseball

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This baseball comes from Philadelphia pitcher Roy Halladay’s spectacular performance on May 29, 2010, at Florida’s Sun Life Stadium. With his 1-0, perfect-game victory over the Marlins, Halladay joined Jim Bunning as the only Phillies moundsmen to retire all 27 batters they faced in a game.

Chuck Klein: MVP-Honoring Trophy

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In 1932, Chuck Klein led the National League in runs (152), hits (226), home runs (38), stolen bases (20), and slugging average (.646). In honor of being named the NL Most Valuable Player for 1932, the Phillies right fielder received this silver trophy between games of a doubleheader, June 24, 1933.

Brad Lidge: World Series Final Out Cap

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While wearing this cap, Phillies closer Brad Lidge recorded the final out of the 2008 World Series, topping off a perfect season in which he converted all 48 save opportunities, including seven in the postseason. Philadelphia’s Series victory marked the first by the club since their World Championship of 1980.

Phillie Phanatic Mascot Costume

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The Phillie Phanatic, famed for his bouncing belly and ATV antics, debuted at Philadelphia’s Veterans Stadium on April 25, 1978. The six-foot six-inch mascot with the party-favor tongue remains a beloved presence at Phillies games to this day.

Jimmy Rollins: 20-20-20 Season Shoes

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Phillies shortstop Jimmy Rollins wore these shoes on the final day of the 2007 regular season. With a line drive to right field in his last at-bat, Rollins collected his 20th triple, becoming just the fourth major leaguer in history with at least 20 doubles, 20 triples, and 20 stolen bases in a season.

Mike Schmidt: First MVP Season Bat

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Mike Schmidt swung this bat with the Phillies in 1980, when he hit a career-high 48 home runs (setting a single-season record for homers by a third baseman), earned the National League MVP Award, and led Philly to its first World Championship.

Sam Thompson: Popularity Trophy

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In 1895, the Philadelphia Phillies held a season-long contest requesting fans to vote for the most popular player on the baseball club. The final tally gave the nod to slugger Sam Thompson, whose .392 batting average and league-best 18 home runs no doubt helped him earn this silver loving cup.

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